Abbott, D. P. “Pizzle Rot.” 1 videocassette (U-matic) (15 min.). [Parkville, Vic.: Centre for the Study of Higher Education University of Melbourne, 1983.

Student made comedy set at Veterinary Science, Werribee.

 

Acheson, Thomas. Recorded Interview 1993.

Interviewer: Carolyn Rasmussen for the History of the University Unit

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Adams, Adrienne. “Confrontation and Resistance: The Academic Life of Gary Foley.” In Melbourne University Characters and Controversies, edited by Chiaroscuro: Department of History, University of Melbourne, 2001.

Foley is an Aboriginal activist, actor and writer, who co-founded the Aboriginal tent Embassy in Canberra in 1972 and co-wrote and acted in the first Aboriginal theatrical production, Basically Black, in1973

 

“Aerial Photograph of Part of Carlton, Fitzroy and Surrounding Areas Including the University of Melbourne.” 1970. Photographic print 90 x 82 cm. mounted on board.

Probably taken in 1970, the photograph shows the Medley Building and McCaughey Court under construction.

 

Agar, Elizabeth. “Press Items on the University Christmas Fete 1936.” 2 cm. 1936.

Press items on the University Christmas Fete 1936, 12 June 1936 - 2 February 1937, with list of takings, pasted in an exercise book; Souvenir Programme and Guide for a Pageant of History and All That, associated with the Fete, containing photographs of some of the women who organized finkit, a picture of the proposed Union building, a plan showing the position of the stalls in the Grounds and (loose) a list of Characters in Daytime Groups; letters of thanks to Mrs. Agar from J.W. Barrett, G.W. Paton and W. Bryden. Three postcards: University views.

 

Agar, Rosie. “A University Childhood.” In Melbourne University Mosaic: People and Places, edited by Three-Four-Eight. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1998.

Based in part on Audrey Cahn’s University Children, an account of the lives of the children of Professors and other officers of the University who lived in the University grounds.

 

Agar, Wilfred Eade. “Papers.” 88 cm (11 boxes), 1882-1951.

Agar was Professor of Zoology, University of Melbourne 1919-48 and  introduced the disciplines of cytology and genetics.  A graduate of  King’s College, Cambridge, he demonstrated in zoology in Glasgow and  travelled to Paraguay prior to coming to Australia.

 

 

Agar, Wilfred Eade. “Papers [in the Basser Library Australian Academy of Science.]”

Includes obituary notices, Agar’s obituary address for Professor L. J. Wrigley (Education), a 28-page Autobiographical Sketch (1948) and three photographs.

 

Ager, Julie. “The Experience and Response of Students of the University of Melbourne During the Depression, 1929-34.” 4th year thesis, University of Melbourne, 1973.

 

Albert, Rita. “A Study of the 1985 Equal Opportunity Reports from Victorian Universities.” M Ed, University of Melbourne, 1989.

 

Aldred, Susan Elizabeth. “An Action Research Approach to Introducing Problem-Based Learning in a Higher Education Setting : A Study in a School of Dental Science.” M Ed, University of Melbourne, 2001.

 

Alford, Katrina. ‘Is university economics training producing male “idiots savants”?’ Economics papers.(Sydney) v.17 no.1(March 1998).

Paper presented to the symposium on Women in Australian Economics, 1997.

 

Allan, Robert Marshall. “Papers.” 12 cm. 1925-1947. 

Includes application of Robert Marshall Allan, M.C. M.D. (Edin.), F.R.C.S.E. F.C.S.A. L.M. (Dublin) for the position of Director of Obstetrical Research , University of Melbourne, 20 August 1925; and for the Chair of Obstetrics, 14 January 1929

(printed and tied into covers).

Educated at schools in Brisbane and Sydney and a graduate of Edinburgh and licentiate of Dublin, where he worked for three years, Allan was in the Royal Army Medical Corps and later the A.I.F. during World War I. After a period of private practice and hospital work as a specialist in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Brisbane, he was appointed Director of Obstetrical Research at the University of Melbourne in 1925, funded by a gift to endow such research from the Trustees of the Edward Wilson (Argus) Fund.

 

Allen, F. “Progress or Stagnation? Women at the University of Melbourne, 1974-84.” PhD, Monash University, 1986.

 

Allen, H. W. The University of Melbourne Record of Active Service of Teachers, Graduates, Undergraduates, Officers and Servants in the European War, 1914-1918.: H.J. Greer, Government Printers, 1926.

 

Allen, Harry Brookes. First General Report on Recognition of Melbourne University Degrees : Mr.  Mansergh’s Scheme for Drainage of Melbourne; Necessity for Re-Survey of Melbourne; the Metropolitan Board of Works; Sewerage Works and Disposal of Sewage by H.B. Allen. Melbourne: Govt. Printer, 1891.

First of three reports made to the Victorian Government after the author’s official visit to Europe.

 

Allen, Harry Brookes. Second General Report on Recognition of Melbourne University Degrees. Melbourne: Govt. Printer, 1891.

 

Allen, Harry Brookes. “Medical Matters in Victoria.” Australasian medical gazette (1907).

 

Allen, Harry Brookes. University of Melbourne Medical School Jubilee, 1914. Carlton [Vic.]: Ford & Son, 1914.

Includes: A History of the Medical School  by Sir Harry Allen.

 

Allen, Harry Brookes. “Papers.” 40 cm (5 boxes), 1854-1926.

Correspondence from scientific colleagues, 1901-1917, original  MSS and galley-proofs of papers, reports and addresses; biographical  material including photographic portraits, press-cuttings, obituaries and memorials. Correspondence, 1909-1913, relating to the foundation and early  administration of the Australian Institute of Tropical Medicine. Professor of Descriptive and Surgical Anatomy 1882-1905, and Professor of Pathology 1906-24 at the University of Melbourne.  He had first joined the University in 1877 and was editor of the  Australian Medical Journal 1879-83.

Allen graduated MB in 1876, M.D. in 1878 and BS from the University of Melbourne. He served as Demonstrator of Anatomy and Pathologist to Melbourne Hospital, until his appointment as Professor of Descriptive and Surgical Anatomy and Pathology 1882-1905 and Pathology 1906-1924. Allen served as Dean of the Faculty of Medicine in 1886-90 and 1896-1924. In 1890 he left for England to support the successful petition of the University to the Privy Council for recognition of Melbourne medical degrees. Allen presided over the Royal Commission into the sanitary state of Victoria, was a member of numerous medical bodies and associations and involved in the establishment of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute. He died in 1926.

 

Allen, Harry Brookes. “Papers.” 16 archives boxes, 1869-1923.

Correspondence; invitations; notes regarding the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute; minutes of meetings of the board; University of Melbourne Medical School curriculum changes; roll books; attendance of lecture books; photographs of specimens; research on venereal diseases, influenza, maternal and infant welfare, common causes of death and invalidity; publications. Includes an undated pencil drawing of door of old Wilson Hall by his daughter Mary.

 

Allen, Harry Brookes. “Papers [in the Basser Library Australian Academcy of Science.]” 1901-1917.

Includes biograpical material including photographic portraits, press-cuttings and obituaries.

 

Allison, Lloyd. An Introduction to the Technical Report Series, Technical Report (University of Melbourne. Dept. Of Computer Science). Melbourne: Dept. of Computer Science, University of Melbourne, 1977.

Discusses the scope and purposes of the Computer Science Department’s Technical Report series, and gives guidelines for the production of reports.

 

Alonso, P. A. G. Directory of Academic Staff : With Index to Topics of Professional Concern and a List of Special Material Held by Staff. Melbourne: Faculty of Architecture Building and Town and Regional Planning University of Melbourne, 1975.

 

Alves, Lesley. “Liberation through Education - with History of the Victorian Women Graduates’ Association.” Honours Thesis, La Trobe University, 1985.

The Australian Federation of University Women – Victoria was established in 1920 to co-ordinate social, intellectual and fund-raising activities. It was renamed the Victorian University Women Graduates’ Association in 1969 and in 1975 became the Australian Federation of University of Women.

 

Amies, Arthur Barton Pilgrim. “ Correspondence; Addresses; Photographs.” 48 cm. (4 archives boxes), 1941-1968.

Amies studied dentistry at the University of Melbourne and medicine at Edinburgh University. He practiced dentistry privately for three years and held various honorary hospital appointments before becoming Professor of Dental Science in 1933. He retired in 1968.

 

———. “Memorabilia.” 12 cm. 1965-1977.

Includes file, “New Building - Press Cuttings (see other buildings)” containing cuttings chiefly relating to Amies’ efforts to obtain a new Dental Hospital and School, building progress and the opening of the Amies Ward. Newscutting book, December 1933 - September 1937.

 

Ancher Mortlock and Woolley. University of Melbourne, University Square Precinct, Master Plan Report 1977. Sydney: Anchor Mortlock & Woolley, 1977. 19 , 7 of plates, [2] folded leaves

 

Ancher Mortlock and Woolley. University of Melbourne Master Plan Report 1981. [[Melbourne: University of Melbourne], 1981. 88 p.

 

Ancher Mortlock and Woolley. University of Melbourne : Master Plan Report 1970. Melbourne: University of Melbourne, 1971. 68 p.

 

Anderson, Catherine. Scholastic Looking and Handsome : Joseph Reed’s Ormond College, an Architectural History 1881-1893. Melbourne: Ormond College, The University of Melbourne, 1992.

The College was built, by resolution of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of Victoria, to serve as a college of residence for students attending the University, and as a theological hall for the training of candidates for the ministry. Bearing the name of its chief benefactor, Francis Ormond, it opened to students in 1881. From 1885, women were among the non-resident students taking advantage of the tutorials offered by the College, and in 1973 were admitted as residents.

 

Anderson, Donald Stuart. “Access to Higher Education: The Link between Admissions and Social Class.” Melbourne studies in education (1983): 99.

 

Anderson, Donald Stuart. “The Person and the Environment in First Year Medicine.” Melbourne studies in education (1964).

 

Anderson, Donald Stuart. “Recruits to the Professions : The Backgrounds, Dispositions and Performance of Students Entering Engineering, Law, Medicine and Teaching.” PhD, University of Melbourne, 1971.

 

Anderson, Donald Stuart. “Student Profiles of Four Professions.” Quarterly review of Australian education v. 4 no. 3, no. December (1970).

 

Anderson, Donald Stuart. “Students of Honours Potential in Pass Courses at the University of Melbourne.” The Educand v. 9 no. 1, no. November 1960 (1960).

 

Anderson, Donald Stuart. Recording of Lunch-Time Discussion on History of Centre for the Study of Higher Education, 2002.

Participants: D. S. Anderson, Barbara Falk, Kwong Lee Dow, R. J. W. Selleck, David Beswick, Craig McInnes, and Carolyn Rasmussen.

 

Anderson, Donald Stuart. Recorded Interview, 2002.

Interviewer: Carolyn Rasmussen.

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Anderson, G.R. MUR – the Regiment and Its History.” Military Review. v.1 no.2(1969).

 

Anderson, George Miller. “University of Melbourne Architectural Atelier Certificate.” 1 foolscap page with photograph affixed, 1928.

 

Anderson, James Robert Valentine. [Dead Heart Expedition, 1901-02]: Album. 1901‑02. ca. 113 photographs: b&w; 8 x 10 – 10 x 15 cm. in album (38 cm.)

Collection of 33 gelatin silver photographs taken by an unknown photographer on JW. Gregory’s Dead Heart expedition, 1901-02, and over 80 photographs relating to James Robert Valentine Anderson, who studied under Gregory at the University of Melbourne, his university days and subsequent professional life, including photographs of mining scenes circa 1910-20 in Walhalla and other parts of Gippsland.

 

Anderson, James Robert Valentine. “Papers.” 12 cm (1 archives box), 1898-1916.

Degree certificates, commencement programmes 1901-1907; newspaper cuttings1898-1916 on mining projects and equipment, radium and wireless, including articles by J.W. Gregory, Professor of Geology, University of Melbourne. Photograph of Mr and Mrs Anderson on diamond wedding anniversary 1967. 1938 commencement program, listing son J. S. (the transferor) as recipient of M.Sc. Photocopy of 1837 plan of Melbourne’s first land sales.

A Melbourne graduate in Mining Engineering of 1906, Anderson lectured for a year at the Bairnsdale School of Mines, and then at the Bendigo School of Mines, where he served as Principal and Director for thirty-five years.

 

Anderson, Tom. The Objectives of Legal Education in Victoria : Rhetoric, Restraint and Reality, a Study of Melbourne and Monash University Law Schools. Melbourne: Melbourne University Student Union, 1990.

 

Angus, A. Grant. “Papers of A. Grant Angus Relating to Funding Cuts and Amalgamation Proposals for the Melbourne State College.” 3 cm. 1977-1982.

From 1978 as a result of reductions in Commonwealth funding teacher education institutions were obliged to reduce enrolments and to seek amalgamation with other institutions. Various plans were conceived for the Melbourne State College and later abandoned. Staff, students and other friends of the College campaigned against this attempt to dismantle it and for a time appeared to have succeeded. However, on 1 January 1989 the College was amalgamated with the University of Melbourne.

A. Grant Angus, who lectured at the College in Mathematics and Science, participated in the protest movement in 1981.

 

Anson, John. “Aspects of the Catering Function at the Melbourne University Union : Report.” MBA, University of Melbourne, 1971.

By John Anson, Tim Plant, and Wal Reid

 

Anwyl, John. “Address Given at the Dinner to Farewell Professor Carrick Chambers from the University of Melbourne, Held at University College on 25 June 1986.” 8 pp. (4 sheets), 1986.

 

Anwyl, John. University Government Relations, Occasional Papers / Australian Vice-Chancellors’ Committee; No. 5. Canberra: Australian Vice-Chancellors’ Committee, 1983.

 

Anwyl, John. Recognition of Teaching Performance in Promotion Procedures : An Evaluation Study of Aspects of Promotions Procedures at the University of Melbourne. Canberra: Australian Govt. Pub. Service, 1992.

By John Anwyl, Margaret Balla and Craig McInnis.

Australia. Department of Employment Education and Training. Evaluations and Investigations Program.

 

Anwyl, John. “Notes of Discussion.” 1992.

Interviewer: Carolyn Rasmussen for the History of the University Unit

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Archer, William Henry. Facts and Figures, or, Notes of Progress, Statistical and General. Carlton, Vic.: Queensberry Hill Press, 1977.

 

Armiger, Martin. Battle Lines Drawn as Vic Govt Tells School to End Entrance Exam. National times. 4-10 July 1982.

 

Armstrong, Judith. The Christesen Romance. Melbourne: Melbourne University Press, 1996.

C. B. Christesen was the founding editor of Meanjin. Nina Christesen was foundation Head of the Russian Department.

 

“Artists in Residence.” University of Melbourne. Staff news. v.6(April 1978).

 

Ashton, David H. ‘John Stewart Turner.’ Historical records of Australian science. v.9 no.3(1992.)

Co-author: Sophie C. Ducker.

 

Association of Commonwealth Universities. Congress, 10th, Melbourne. “Papers Relating to the Organisation of Tours and Functions in Melbourne Universities.” 24 cm. 1965-1968.

Papers relating to the organisation of tours and functions in Melbourne universities, as well as tours to areas of interest around Melbourne: itineraries, programmes, administrative arrangements, lists of delegates, summaries, reports and accounts. Minutes of the Sydney, Canberra and Melbourne Regional Committees are included.

 

Astbury, Emma. “Pierre Gorman: Pioneers Are Made, Not Born.” In Melbourne University Mosaic: People and Places, edited by Three-Four-Eight. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1998.

Gorman was born in Melbourne in 1924 and educated at Melbourne University and Cambridge. Profoundly deaf from birth, he had a distinguished academic career in deaf education in Australia, Canada and the UK and, as an advocate and adviser on services for the disabled, sat on various government committees. His long- standing interest in Cambridge, both the university and the town, resulted in his internationally-important collection of books on Cambridge, which was acquired by the University of Melbourne’s Baillieu Library in 1994

 

Atkinson, H. F. In Defence of Ivory Towers : The History of the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne, 1990.

 

Atkinson, H. F. The Ladies Auxiliary : Sixty Five Years of Service, the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne Auxiliary, 1928-1993. [Melbourne, Vic.: H.F. Atkinson?], 1993.

 

Atkinson, H. F. The Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne, 1890-1990. Melbourne, Vic.: printed by Waterwheel Press, 1990.

 

Attwood, Harold. “Gordon, Clunes, McKay Mathison.” Chiron. v.2 no.5(1996).

 

Attwood, Harold. “To Speculate on Speculum.” Chiron. v.2 no.1(1988)

 

Attwood, Harold. Festschrift for Kenneth Fitzpatrick Russell. Melbourne: Queensberry Hill Press, 1978.

Co-editor: Geoffrey Kenny.

 

Attwood, Harold. Occasional Papers on Medical History Australia. 1st (English). ed. Parkville, Vic.: Medical History Society A.M A (Victorian Branch) : Medical History Unit University of Melbourne, 1984.

By Harold Attwood,  Frank M. C. Forster, Bryan Gandevia and Medical History Society (Vic.)

 

Attwood, Harold. Patients, Practitioners and Techniques : Second National Conference on Medicine and Health in Australia, 1984, Occasional Papers on Medical History Australia;. Parkville, Vic.: Medical History Unit and Dept. of History and Philosophy of Science University of Melbourne : Medical History Society AMA (Victorian Branch), 1985.

By Harold Attwood and R. W. Home

 

Attwood, Harold. Reflections on Medical History and Health in Australia : Third National Conference on Medical History and Health in Australia 1986, Occasional Papers on Medical History Australia 3. Parkville, Vic.: Medical History Unit University of Melbourne and Medical History Society AMA (Victorian Branch), 1987.

By Harold Attwood and Geoffrey Kenny.

 

Augustine, Laurie. “Wilfred Prest; a Fixture Amidst Changes.” In Melbourne University Mosaic: People and Places, edited by Three-Four-Eight. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1998.

Prest (1907-85) was the University’s second-longest serving Professor. He headed the Department of Economics for 25 years and served as Dean of the Faculty.

 

Austin, A. G. “George William Rusden : A Study of the Part Played by G.W. Rusden in the Establishment of a System of National Education in Australia between 1849 and 1862.” M Ed, University of Melbourne, 1956.

 

Austin, A. G. George William Rusden and National Education in Australia, 1849-1862. Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Press, 1958.

 

Austin, A. G. Australian Education 1788-1900: Church, State and Public Education in Colonial Australia. Melbourne: Pitman, 1972.

 

Australia Party Club. “Papers.” 1 archive box, 1971-1975.

 

Australia. Army. Melbourne University Regiment. “Outline of History of Melbourne University Rifles 1884-1936.” 20 pp. A4 (1 cm.), 1884-1936.

By R. K. Peacock, Melbourne University Regiment and Melbourne University Rifles.

 

Australia. Army. Melbourne University Regiment. The Military Review. Vol. Vol. 1, no. 1 (Aug. 1968)-. North Clayton, Vic.: Melbourne University Regiment and Monash University Company, 1968.

By Melbourne University Regiment and Monash University Company.

 

Australian Dental Council. Report and Recommendation of the Accreditation Committee to the Australian  Dental Council on the Accreditation of the Undergraduate Course in Dentistry at the School of Dental Science, the University of Melbourne. Melbourne: Australian Dental Council, 1996.

 

Australian Federation of University Women, Victoria. “Deleted Membership Cards.” 10 cm. 1929-1977.

Formerly Victorian Women Graduates’ Association

 

Australian Federation of University Women, Victoria. “Index of Membership Cards.” 24 cm. (2 archives boxes), 1980.

 

Australian Federation of University Women, Victoria. “Papers.” 48 cm. 4 archives boxes. 1982-1985.

 

Australian Federation of University Women, Victoria. “Papers.” 2cm. 1947-1981.

 

Australian Federation of University Women, Victoria. “Papers.” 48 cm. 4 archives boxes, 1982-1985.

Includes papers of Victorian Women Graduates’ Association.

 

Australian Federation of University Women, Victoria. “Papers.” 1 cm, 1985.

Includes papers of Victorian Women Graduates’ Association.

 

Australian Federation of University Women, Victoria. “Papers.” 24 cm. (2 archives boxes), 1980.

Includes papers of Victorian Women Graduates’ Association.

 

Australian Federation of University Women, Victorian Branch. “Papers.” 48 cm. 1930-1989.

 

Australian Federation of University Women Victorian Branch. “Papers.” 2cm. 1947-1981.

Includes papers of Victorian Women Graduates’ Association.

 

Australian Federation of University Women Victorian Branch. “Papers.” 10 cm, 1929-1977.

Includes papers of Victorian Women Graduates’ Association.

 

Australian Goethe Society. Victorian Branch. “Papers.” 24 cm. (2 archives boxes), 1947-1973.

 

Australian Institute Of Landscape Architects. Landscape Australia : The University of Melbourne Landscape: The Landscape of the University of Melbourne. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Landscape Architects, 1980.

 

Australian News and Information Bureau. International House. Melbourne, 1963.

This Hall of Residence, founded to foster international understanding and friendship among students at a time of increasing numbers of overseas students coming to the University, arose from student and staff interest, the support of the Council, and the assistance of the State Government which passed the amending Act necessary to allow the University to provide accommodation for students in 1951. An Appeal was launched in June 1952 and the first residential (Clunies Ross) wing and central block built in 1956. Intended to house equal numbers of overseas and Australian students, it opened in 1957 with 42 students.

 

Australian Physical Education Association. Victorian Branch. “Papers.” 12 cm. (1 archives box), 1938-1970.

The Physical Education Association of Victoria was founded in 1938, members being holders of the recently-introduced Diploma of Physical Education at the University of Melbourne, or some other approved qualification. The national body was formed in 1954, the Victorian Association adopting the above name in 1955. In 1971, the body became the Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, Victorian Branch.

 

Australian Society of the History of Medicine. National Conference (1st : 1989 : Sydney N.S.W.). New Perspectives on the History of Medicine : First National Conference of the Australian Society of the History of Medicine, 1989, Occasional Papers on Medical History Australia; 4. Melbourne: Medical History Unit University of Melbourne and The Society, 1990.

By Harold Attwood, Richard Gillespie and M. J. Lewis.

 

Australian Vice-Chancellors’ Committee. and Association of Universities of the British Commonwealth. “A Symposium on the Place of the Australian University in the Community, and, Post-Graduate Studies in Australian Universities.” [Canberra, A.C.T.] 1955.

 

“Axel Lodewycks.” 1962. Photograph inscribed on back 24.12.62

Glossy print

Lodewycks (1910-1990) was Deputy Librarian at the University of Melbourne 1948-1956; and University Librarian 1956-1973.

 

“Bachelor of Science Graduates on Wilson Hall Steps.” 1925. Photograph.

Emeritus Professor Cook, the donor, is at the extreme left front row, then 19 years old. Professor Cook writes: “I was probably the only pure B.Sc. graduate on Biochemistry at that time”. The others were B Ag Sc etc.

 

Badger, C. R. Recorded Interview, 1992.

Badger (1906-93), was born in Peterborough, South Australia, attended the University of Adelaide. His career was to be in adult education through the Council of Adult Education, which he helped to establish in 1947, becoming its director. He was awarded an honorary doctorate just before his death.

Interviewer: J. R. Poynter for the History of the University Unit

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Badger, C. R. Who Was Badger? : Aspects of the Life and Work of Colin Robert Badger, Director of Adult Education, Victoria, 1947-1971. Melbourne: Council of Adult Education, 1984.

 

Baglin, Lois. “Dr Alice Hoy: An Icon of Education.” In Melbourne University Portraits: They Called It ‘the Shop’, edited by Paper-Clip Collective. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1996.

Graduating at Melbourne, B A 1914, Dip Ed 1915, M A 1916 Alice Hoy was appointed to the University High School (a practising school for trainee teachers) in 1915. In 1924 she became Mistress of Method of History at the Melbourne Teachers’ College and was from 1926- 1957 part-time Senior Lecturer in Education in the University, though transferred from the College to the staff of the University High School as an economy measure in 1933. However, she remained chiefly engaged in University work. When a Secondary Teachers’ College was established in 1950, she became its first Principal. She retired from the University and the College in February 1958. She was a foundation member of the Monash University Council 1958-1971, and of the Australian College of Education, 1959-1971, and was a council member of the University Women’s College, 1936-1964. Her Civics for Australian Schools ran to many editions, and she published a history of University High School, A City Built to Music, in 1961.

 

Bagnall, Diana. ‘Caps off to the Lady Doctors.’ Vogue Australia. v.31 no.11(Nov 1987).

 

Bailey, Kenneth. “Papers [in the National Library of Australia].” Canberra, 1912-72.

The material ranges over such subjects as degree conferring, Wesley College, Melbourne, the Student Christian Movement, and various questions of law and legislation.

Sir Kenneth Bailey was born in Melbourne in 1898. He served in the A.I.F. and studied at Oxford University in history, then law, having been appointed Professor of Jurisprudence in 1928 and Professor of Public Law in 1931. In1946 Sir Kenneth was appointed Solicitor-General, and remained with the Attorney-General’s Dept. until 1964. He was Australian High Commissioner to Canada from1964 until his retirement in 1969.

 

Baird, B. G. “Report on Marketing of Student Accommodation in the Melbourne University Colleges.” MBA, 1971.

By B. G. Baird, A. E. Hope, and D. R. Walter.

 

Baker, Djoymi. “‘Film Barons Put in Place’: The Establishment of Cinema Studies in the Fine Arts Department.” In Melbourne University Mosaic: People and Places, edited by Three-Four-Eight. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1998.

 

Baker, Jean. ‘The School of Forestry and Its Early Principals.’ Central Highlands historical journal. no.1(Summer 1993).

 

Baker, Quita. “Photographs.” 1942-1945.

Three photographs of Quita Baker alone and with Freda Crossley and Ernst Matthaei in the Botany School laboratory.

Quita Baker was appointed a Special War Worker Grade III, Botany, on 4 March 1942, and Assistant Grade III on 22 May 1942. She worked on optical munitions in the Botany School until 1945, resigning on 15 December 1945.

 

Ball, W. Macmahon. “Papers [in the National Library of Australia].” Canberra, 1921-85.

Political scientist and diplomat, Ball taught at the University of Melbourne and undertook missions in South-East Asia. He was Advisor to the United Nations Conference in San Francisco in 1945 and a member of the Allied Council for Japan, 1946-47. He was a regular commentator on world affairs for the ABC and in newspapers and magazines.

Correspondence, typed diaries, drafts of articles, reports, press cuttings, printed matter and other papers relating to most aspects of Ball’s career and his involvement in political organisations. Correspondents include Tristan Buesst, Richard Boyer, Creighton Burns, Manning Clark, L.F. Crisp, W.D. Forsyth, Hartley Grattan, Sir Henry Gullett, Norman Harper, R.H. Molesworth, Sir Charles Moses, Nettie Palmer, G.O. Reid, Peter Ryan and David Sissons.

 

Ball, W. Macmahon. “W. Macmahon Ball.” In More Memories of Melbourne University: Undergraduate Life in the Years since 1919, edited by Hume Dow. Melbourne: Hutchinson, 1985.

 

Ballantyne, Glenda. “Papers.” 4 cm. 1974-1978.

Leaflets; survey finding; newspaper clippings; Australian Union of Students Women’s Department leaflets, minutes, draft policy, reports, notes, correspondence, constitution, registration forms; educational; programs, articles, leaflets; Women’s Trade Union Conference program, leaflets, articles, monographs, questionnaire; Women’s Theatre Group posters; ‘Women at Work’, produced by the Working Women’s Centre.

This collection is part of the Victorian Women’s Liberation and Lesbian Feminist Archive.

 

Barbour, R. R. P. “The Development of the Union.” University gazette (1946).

 

Barker, Alice. “The Princess Ida Club: Fostering Amongst Women a Feeling of Esprit De Corps.” In Melbourne University Characters and Controversies, edited by Chiaroscuro: Department of History, University of Melbourne, 2001.

The Club was formed in 1888 to “promote the common interests of, and to form a bond of union between the present and past women students”. Its activities included social functions, debates, literary discussions. It ceased to exist in 1915, having formed a Committee within the Union to represent the interests of University women.

 

Barko, Ivan Peter. “Languages at the University - Tensions, Past and Present; Farewell Lecture by the Head, School of Languages, Wednesday 1 June 1994.” 19 pp + cover, 1994.

Barko, was born in Hungary and settled in Australia in 1956. He lectured at the University College, Newcastle, became Reader at the University of Melbourne in 1967, and in the same year Professor of French at Monash University. From 1975 until 1991 he was McCaughey Professor of French at the University of Sydney. In 1993 he was appointed Visiting Professor and Foundation Head of the School of Languages at the University of Melbourne.

 

Barrett, James William. “Papers.” 7.5 metres, 1883-1946.

Correspondence; notes; memoranda; manuscripts of writings; publications regarding University affairs, medical research and practice, politics and international affairs 1879-1942.

Barrett was born in 1862. He graduated in medicine at the University of Melbourne in 1887, and proceeded to Kings College, London, to qualify in surgery. After several appointments at London hospitals, he joined the staff of the Medical School at the University of Melbourne later becoming surgeon at the Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital. During  WWI, he was a lieutenant-colonel in the Australian Army Medical Corps. In 1931 Barrett succeeded Sir John Monash as Vice-Chancellor and was appointed Chancellor from 1934 to 1939. Barrett was active in public affairs, and was particularly interested in the British Empire, Japanese affairs and the role of the University.

 

Barrett, James William. “Papers.” 1879-1942.

Includes papers on the University of Melbourne 1908-1942.

 

Barrett, James William. Eighty Eventful Years. Melbourne, 1945.

 

Barrett, Peter. “Leighton Irwin: Director of the Melbourne University Architectural Atelier.” In Melbourne University Mosaic: People and Places, edited by Three-Four-Eight. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1998.

Irwin (1892-1962), is remembered for his work in hospital architecture and in architectural education, notably as director of the Melbourne University Architectural Atelier.

 

Barry, Redmond. “Papers, 1847-1875 [in the State Library of Victoria].” 17.0 cm, 1847-1875.

Founder of both  the University of Melbourne  and  the Melbourne Public Library, now the State Library of Victoria.

 

Barton, John Colin. “Papers.” 48 cm. (4 archives boxes), 1930-1974.

Includes file on the University property “Blackwood”; concert and theatre programmes 1938-1946; photographs (n.d.); student magazines 1940-1974.

Barton joined the University of Melbourne as a lecturer- demonstrator in Physics at the Mildura Branch 1947-1950. A senior tutor in Mathematics in 1955, he became senior lecturer in that department, retiring in 1982

 

Bassett, Marnie. “Papers [in the State Library of Victoria.]” 9.0 cm, 1916-1974.

Includes diary letter-book, 6 December 1916-18 November 1918 (570 p.); three papers read to the Lyceum Club, 1956, 1969, 1972 (80 p.); paper read to the Royal Historical Society of Victoria, 1968 (25 p.); and paper read at a graduation ceremony, University of Melbourne, 1974 (11 p.).

“Marnie” Bassett, daughter of Sir David Orme Masson was born in Melbourne and educated privately. She married Walter Bassett in 1923 and published a number of works on Australasian exploration and colonial history including The Governor’s Lady (1940); and The Hentys (1954”. Her sister Elsie, also a writer, married the anthropologist Bronislav Malinowski. Lady Barrett was awarded the Litt.D. (Hon.) by Monash University in 1968 and by the University of Melbourne in 1974. She died at ninety in 1980.

 

Bates, Smart and McCutcheon Pty Ltd. Wilson Hall drawings including working drawings; sketches; surveys; plans; light fixtures; garden works details. 1952-62. Two rolls of architectural plans.

One of Melbourne’s leading practices since Joseph Reed’s arrival in 1852, the firm has designed many of Victoria’s most prominent buildings. Since 1862 it has been run as a partnership incorporating the names of Reed (1862-1890), Frederick Barnes (1862-1883), A.M. Henderson (1883-1890, F.J. Smart (1883-1907), W.B. Tappin (1890-1905), N.B. Peebles (1907-1922), C.P. Smart (1907-1950), E.A. Bates (1907-1031) and Osborne McCutcheon 1926-) in various combinations.

 

Battle, Claire. “‘Most Eminent Woman’: Lady Janet Clarke.” In Melbourne University Mosaic: People and Places, edited by Three-Four-Eight. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1998.

Janet Snodgrass (1851-1909) married pastoralist William Clarke and became a leader of Melbourne social  and cultural life. Her support of the Trinity College Women’s Hostel is acknowledged in the current name of Janet Clarke Hall.

 

“The Beaurepaire Centre with Roof Hanging over the Facade Following a Storm. c. July 1992.”  2 photographic prints 1992.

 

Bebbington, Laurie. Recorded Interview. Melbourne, 2002.

Bebbington has been employed in the Victorian Department of Human Services in areas ranging from program effectiveness to methadone and other treatments for drug addition.

Interviewer: Carolyn Rasmussen.

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Béchervaise, John. The University of Melbourne : An Illustrated Perspective. Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Press, 1985.

 

Béchervaise, John. University of Melbourne Sketchbook, Sketchbook Series. Adelaide: Rigby, 1977.

Text: John Béchervaise;  drawings: William Beasley.

 

Beeston, Janet. “A Glimpse of the Life of Brian.” In Melbourne University Portraits: They Called It ‘the Shop’, edited by Paper-Clip Collective. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1996.

Lewis (1906-91) was educated at the universities of Liverpool, London and Melbourne. He was the inaugural Professor of Architecture and occupied the position from 1947 to 1971. He was Dean of Architecture and the first Chairman of the National Trust, Victoria.

 

Behan, John Clifford Valentine. “Papers.” 1 metre, 1890-1941.

Diaries 1925-1941; certificates and testimonials submitted with application for the Rhodes Scholarship; newspaper clippings regarding marriage and career 1890-1924.

The first Victorian Rhodes Scholar (1904), Behan read Law at Oxford, was admitted to the Bar, and lectured at University and Worcester Colleges before returning as Warden of his old college in 1918. He remained in the post until 1946.

 

Beighton, F. C. L. Submission to the Royal Commission on Human Relationships. Parkville, Vic.: University of Melbourne.

By F. C. L. Beighton and J. B. Cole.

 

Beighton, F. C. L. “Student Costs and Incomes.” University of Melbourne, Students’ Representative Council, 197?

By F. C. L. Beighton and M O’Connell.

 

Bell, T. T. J. Recorded Interview. Melbourne, 1999.

            Bell was the University of Melbourne’s 10th Registrar.

Interviewer:  Peter McPhee for the History of the University Unit

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Belz, Maurice Henry. “Papers.” 2 cm, 1914-1975.

Includes curriculum vitae, tributes to Belz following his retirement in December 1963; obituary, eulogy, 1975. Photograph of Belz, n.d.; Christmas card from Harold Holt (P.M.) and Mrs. Holt, 1966.

Belz was born in Auburn, N.S.W. and educated at the Universities of Sydney and Cambridge. Appointed lecturer in the University of Melbourne’s Mathematics Department in 1923 and senior lecturer in 1928, he served as Acting Professor in 1936 and became Associate Professor in 1939. Having made Theory of Statistics and Mathematical Economics his special subjects, he was appointed head of the new Department of Statistics in 1948, from 1955 as Professor. Apart from journal articles, he published in 1937, with Professor J.H. Michell, The Elements of Mathematical Analysis (London), in 1948, Notes for Matriculation General Mathematics, and in 1973 Statistical Methods for the Process Industries (London). Belz was active in University affairs, being the sub- Professorial staff representative on Council 1935-1947 and sub-dean of the Arts Faculty 1942-1944. He was foundation President (1939) and long- time supporter of the Tin Alley Players. Among his extra-mural interests was the French-Australian Association, of which he was president 1944- 1970 and which, with Professor A.R. Chisholm, he had helped to found.

 

Belz, Maurice Henry. “Papers.” 12 cm. 1947-1979.

Includes an account of the Department of Statistics, c. 1952 and five photographs: Cambridge groups (4) 1921, with key, including Belz, T.M. Cherry, Ernest Rutherford, J.J. Thomson and J. Chadwick; University Lake c. 1905?.

 

Belz, Maurice Henry. “Papers.” 1 cm. 19--.

 

Berry, R. J. A. “Some Recent Advances in the Medical School of the University of Melbourne.” Melbourne University magazine (1908).

 

Berry, R. J. A. Chance and Circumstance. 195-?

Unpublished autobiography.

Held in Leonoard J. T. Murphy, “Papers.” in the University of Melbourne Archives.

 

Berry, W.E.F. “The First Hundred Years.” Melbourne graduate (1955).

 

Best, Lauren. Melbourne’s Universities.’ Melburnian. v.2 no.5(Dec/Jan 1988).

 

Beswick, D.G. Interview of Professor David Caro by Professor D.G. Beswick, January-February 1988, 1988. 1 reel-to-reel tape.

 

Beswick, D.G. Selective Admissions under Pressure : An Evaluation and Development Study of Student Selection Procedures at the University of Melbourne. Parkville [Vic.]: Centre for the Study of Higher Education University of Melbourne, 1984.

 

Beswick, D. G.  Interviews by Professor Beswick with Professor Sir David Derham and Professor David Caro, 1982-1988.

 

Beswick, D. G. Experimental First Year Program in Humanities : Evaluation of Special Studies in the Faculty of Arts, University of Melbourne, 1978-9. Parkville [Vic.]: Centre for the Study of Higher Education University of Melbourne, 1981.

By D. G. Beswick, Cleo Macmillan and Elaine Counsell.

 

Bionic Ear Institute (Australia). Annual Report Bionic Ear Institute. Melbourne: The Institute, 1994/1995.

 

Bird, Delys. ‘More questions about sex and power and The First Stone.’ Overland. no.142(1996)

 

Blackwood, Margaret. “Personal Papers,.” 22 archives boxes. Melbourne, 1936-1986.

Correspondence; photographs; diaries; memorabilia; personal files; WAAF papers; Women’s Graduate Centenary Committee papers; Newnham College rolls; publications; photograph of unidentified University students, c. 1890’s; B A degree certificate with seal attached of Ada McKay.

Blackwood graduated B.Sc. and M.Sc. at the University of Melbourne in 1938 and 1939, supported in further research in botany by a Government Scholarship and, from November 1940 by the MacBain Research Scholarship. In 1941 she joined the W.A.A.A.F. in which she served until 1946. After being Dean of Women at the University’s Mildura Branch in 1947-1948 she went to Cambridge on an ex-service postgraduate scholarship. She was awarded a Ph.D. for her work in plant genetics. On her return to Melbourne Blackwood taught genetics. At the time of her retirement in 1974 a Reader in Botany and was on retirement appointed as a Senior Associate in Botany. In 1974 she was elected to the Council of the University of Melbourne and served for eight years. In 1980 Blackwood was elected Deputy Chancellor, a post she held until retiring in 1983. Margaret Blackwood died in 1986.

 

Blainey, Geoffrey. A Centenary History of the University of Melbourne. Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Press, 1957.

Blainey was educated at Ballarat High School, Wesley College and the University of Melbourne. After graduating and working as a free-lance historian, Blainey became Professor of Economic History in 1968 and Ernest Scott Professor of History in 1977. He has been a member of and presided over numerous public bodies and is the author of many publications, chiefly in the field of Australian History. Blainey also has a high public profile in the media and since 1974 has been a regular columnist for various newspapers and journals, including “The Age”, “Melbourne Herald”, “The Australian” and “Australian Business Monthly”

 

Blainey, Geoffrey. “ Invitations and Correspondence.” 1 cm. 1979-1980.

 

Blainey, Geoffrey. “Papers.” 24 cm. (2 boxes), 1977-1979.

 

Blainey, Geoffrey. “Papers.” 55 archives boxes, 1965-1988.

 

Blainey, Geoffrey. “Papers.” 94 cm. (8 archives boxes), 1973-1979.

 

Blainey, Geoffrey. “Papers.” 31 archives boxes, 1962-1980.

 

Blainey, Geoffrey. “Papers Assembled by Professor Blainey as Chairman of the Department of Psychology Review Committee.” 24 cm. (2 archive boxes), 1986.

 

Blainey, Geoffrey. The University of Melbourne : A Centenary Portrait. Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Press, 1956.

By Geoffrey Blainey and Norman H. Olver.

 

Blomquist and Wark. Master Plan Report for the Law School, the University of Melbourne. [Melbourne]: Blomquist and Wark, 1988.

 

Blood, D. C. The University of Melbourne School of Veterinary Science : A Recent History 1962-1992. Melbourne: The School, 1992.

 

Boas, Walter. “Papers [in the Basser Library Australian Academy of Science].” 1904-1982.

Boas (1904-1982) was born in Berlin. Educated at the Technische Hochschule Berlin (Dip Engin 1928, Dr Ing 1930). Assistant research officer, physics section, Kaiser Wilhelm Institute für Metallforschung, Berlin-Dahlem 1928-32; assistant physics department, University of Fribourg 1933-35; research officer, physics department, Technische Hochschule Zürich 1936-37; research associate, Royal Institution, London 1937-38; lecturer in metallurgy, University of Melbourne 1938-40; senior lecturer 1940-47; principal research officer, CSIR Division of Tribophysics 1947-  49, chief 1949-69. Fellow, Australian Academy of Science 1954.

 

Bolton, Herbert C. “Letters on the Osborne/Sutherland Collaboration.” 19--.

Copies of notes on Professor W.A. Osborne, copies of letters between Professor W.A. Osborne and William Sutherland, and notes of conversation with Dr. L.W. Weickhardt on the Osborne/Sutherland collaboration; Bolton’s correspondence concerning T. Brailsford Robertson and other matters with son David S. Robertson (formerly head of Weapons Research, Salisbury, S.A.) and others. The copies of letters are from various sources, including University of Melbourne Archives.

 

Bolton, Herbert C. “Optical Instruments in Australia in the 1939-45 War: Successes and Lost Opportunities.” The Australian physicist v. 21 no. 3 (1990): 31-33.

 

Bolton, Herbert C. “Papers Relating to Research on Optical Instruments Panel, and J.J. McNeill.” 12 cm, 19.

 

Bolton, Herbert C. “Papers Relating to the Optical Munitions Group.” 12 cm. (one archives box), 1944-1947.

Copy of J.S. Rogers The History of the Scientific Instruments and Optical Panel, initially Optical Munitions Panel, July 1940 - December 1946 (draft, confidential, document of Commonwealth of Australia, Ministry of Munitions, Ordnance Production Directorate); OMP photograph 1943; data used in work on OMP including questionnaire and replies from former workers for the panel, 1985 - 1986. Professor Bolton’s MS on Optical Munitions Panel. Two reports on tropic proofing of tropical instruments: July 1944; 1947 (by Turner, McLennan, Rogers).

 

Booth, Ada Phyllis. “Papers.” 12 cm. 1955-1961.

Includes typed notes on procedures to be followed during the year and records to be kept by staff in respect of classes.

Booth graduated B.Sc. in April 1943; and B A(Hon) in 1961. She was appointed Laboratory Assistant in 1942; Part-time Demonstrator in Physics 1953; Senior Demonstrator in 1955; Assistant Lecturer in 1961 and Lecturer in 1974. She retired from the Physics School on 31 January 1987.

 

Bottoms, Martin Henry.University of Melbourne Extension Lectures Syllabuses.” 1 cm. 1894-1897.

Bottoms (1871-1969) passed the University of Melbourne matriculation exam in 1888 and in the same year sat for the Public Service. In March 1889, Bottoms was appointed fifth class clerk in the Department of Education. He was gradually promoted in the Education Department and became third class clerk and Private Secretary to the Minister of Education as Registrar of the Council of Public Education in 1910. By 1913 Bottoms had become second class clerk and Senior Clerk and in 1920 was promoted to first class clerk and appointed a reclassified position as Secretary at the Education

Department. Martin Bottoms retired from the Education Department in 1937 after forty eight years service.

 

Boyd, Robin. “Photographic Prints Documenting Robin Boyd’s Work Assembled for the Posthumous Travelling Exhibition.” 1938-1970.

Includes Ormond College (University of Melbourne).

Boyd was a seminal Melbourne modern architect, product of a celebrated artistic family and partner in Grounds, Romberg and Boyd. He wrote Australia’s Home (1952), The Australian Ugliness 1960), The Puzzle of Architecture (1960). In 1973, Patrick McCaughey organised an exhibition at the Newcastle City Art Gallery and the University of Melbourne Gallery of a large collection of photographic prints of a selection of Robin Boyd’s important buildings. It was assembled as a posthumous travelling exhibition.

 

Brady, Veronica. Interview with Sister Veronica Brady, Senior Lecturer, English Dept. University of Western Australia, 1989.

Brady speaks with Stuart Reid about her family background; childhood in Victoria during the Depression; school at a Sisters of Mercy Convent and later at a Loreto Convent; views on the Catholic Church during her childhood; singing at Melbourne University; Newman Society, etc.  Recorded for the National Library of Australia and J.S. Battye Library of West Australian History.

Inquiries to the National Library of Australia.

 

Breadon, I. D. “Reporting on Investments at the University of Melbourne.” MBA, University of Melbourne, 1974.

 

Brennan, Niall. The Melbourne University Students’ Songbook. Melbourne: Students’ Representative Council, University of Melbourne, 1946.

 

Brett, Peter. “Papers.” 24 cm (2 archives boxes), 1954-1966.

Includes Special Council Meeting on Orr Case 1966, notes and memoranda, Orr’s curriculum vitae, & published material.

Brett was Hearn Professor of Law 1963-64 and Professor of Jurisprudence 1964-65. He also served as President of the Federated Association of University Staff Associations. In this position, he played a major role in bringing the controversial Orr Case to settlement.

 

Brett, Peter. “Papers [in the National Library of Australia].” 3 tapes, 1 fol. package. Canberra, 1950-75.

 

Broad, Jeffery Stuart. A Colonial Apprenticeship: the Career of Hugh Childers with Special Reference to His Sojourn in Melbourne, 1850-1857. PhD D, Monash University, 1988.

 

Broadstock, Brenton. Aflame with Music : 100 Years of Music at the University of Melbourne. Parkville, Vic.: Centre for Studies in Australian Music University of Melbourne, 1996.

 

Broberg, Faye. A Short History of the Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne. Parkville: Graduate Union, University of Melbourne, 2002.

At foot of title: 150 years, 1853-2003.

 

Brookes, Herbert. “Papers [in the National Library of Australia].” 25.6 m. Canberra, 1869-1970.

Correspondence, notes, diaries, minute books,  photographs and cuttings covering every phase of the careers of Herbert and Ivy Brookes. There are papers on the University of Melbourne (1933-1947) and the Lady Northcote Permanent Trust Fund (1908-1969). The main correspondents are: Sir Kenneth Bailey, Sir James Barrett, Sir Norman Brookes, S.M. Bruce, W.J. Cleary, Sir Joseph Cook, Bishop Philip Crick, Alfred and Pattie Deakin, Sir Frederic Eggleston, Sir Littleton Groom, Sir Bernard Heinze, W.M. Hughes, Arthur Woodward,  Sir Richard Jebb, H. Price, Ina Fisher, Timothy Littleton, J.S. Crow, Philip Kennedy, Sir Walter Leitch, A.H.S. Lucas, Jane McMillan, Professor G.W.L. Marshall-Hall, Sir Walter Massey-Green, Sir Walter Murdoch, George Nicholas, Sir George Pearce, Sir Claude Reading, Staniforth Ricketson, Sir David Rivett, Rohan Rivett, T.E. Ruth, Rev. Charles Strong and Mary Allen.

Herbert Brookes (1867-1964) was educated at Wesley College, University of Melbourne. Graduated B. Eng. employers’ representative on the Board of Trade 1918-1928, Tariff Board 1922-1928; Commissioner-General U.S.A. 1929-1930; Vice-Chairman A.B.C. 1932-1940; Council, University of Melbourne 1933-1947. His wife Ivy Deakin Brookes (1833-1970) served on the executive of the National Council of Women 1912-1970, and the Women’s Hospital 1921-1970; member Faculty of Music, University of Melbourne 1926-1969.

 

Brott Danby, Cipa. “Papers.” 72 cm. (6 archives boxes), 1939-1973.

Includes Victorian University Women Graduates’ Association minutes and correspondence.

Brott Danby was born in 1923 and graduated in law from the University of Melbourne in 1947.

 

Brown, Nicholas. Richard Downing : Economics, Advocacy and Social Reform in Australia. Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Press, 2001.

 

Brownless, Anthony Colling. The University of Melbourne Chancellor’s Address at the Annual Commencement,16th March, 1895. Melbourne: Ford & Son, Printers, 1895.

Brownless (1817-1897), was born in England. After studying medicine at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in London, and at the University of Liège, he was admitted M.R.C.S. of London in 1841, and M.D of St Andrews in 1846. After practising as a physician in London, Brownless arrived in Victoria in December 1852 and was appointed Physician to the Melbourne Benevolent Asylum. In 1854 he became the Physician to the Melbourne Hospital where he remained working until his retirement in 1856 and was appointed Life Governor and Consulting Physician. In June 1855, Brownless was given the Diploma of M.D. by the University of Melbourne (the first time the University conferred the degree) and soon founded the medical school. From 1858 to 1887, Brownless was annually elected Vice Chancellor of the University. In 1887 he succeeded Moorhouse and was appointed Chancellor.

 

Brownless, Anthony Colling. The University of Melbourne Chancellor’s Address at the Annual Commencement,18th March, 1893. Melbourne: Ford & Son, Printers, 1893.

 

Brownless, Anthony Colling. The University of Melbourne Chancellor’s Address at the Annual Commencement,19th March, 1892. Melbourne: Edgerton and Moore, Printers, 1892.

 

Brownless, Anthony Colling. The University of Melbourne Chancellor’s Address at the Annual Commencement, 21st March, 1896. Melbourne: Ford & Son, Printers, 1896.

 

Brownless, Anthony Colling. The University of Melbourne, Chancellor’s Address at the Annual Commencement,  20th March, 1897. Melbourne: University of Melbourne, 1897.

 

Bryce, Lucy. “Photograph of the Water-Colour Sketch by Dr. Lucy Bryce of Old Zoology (Titled “Biology School”) Seen across the Lake.” 1916.

The drawing was done when Bryce was a student in 1916. Attached is a pencil sketch and note by Professor Burke “Good. We must get the lake put back. Please arrange with Mr. Gray.”, 11 December 1950

Graduating in Medicine from Melbourne University in 1922, Bryce held research posts at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research from 1922 to 1928. She was the honorary director of the Victorian Blood Transfusion Service, organising a panel of donors who would attend hospitals when donations were required. Her responsibilities included blood grouping, laboratory testing and medical care of the donors.

 

Buchanan, Roderick David. A Fiftieth Anniversary History : The Department of Psychology, the University of Melbourne, 1946-1996. Melbourne: Department of Psychology School of Behavioural Science The University of Melbourne, 1996.

 

Buckley, Vincent. Conversation with Vincent Buckley, 1969.

Interviewer: Hazel De Berg.

Inquiries to the National Library of Australia.

 

Buckley, Vincent. Cutting Green Hay : Friendships, Movements and Cultural Conflicts in Australia’s Great Decades. Melbourne: Allen Lane / Penguin, 1983.

Buckley was Professor of English at the University of Melbourne from1967. He was also a poet and an active participant in Australian Catholic intellectual life.

 

Buckley, Vincent. “ Papers, 1952-1986 [in the National Library of Australia].” 2.24 m. (16 boxes), 1952-1986.

Includes Series 2: working  correspondence: material relating to university career and affairs, meetings, conferences, etc.

 

Bull, L. B. “Gilruth as Teacher.” Australian veterinary journal (1937).

 

Bullen, Margaret. ‘Repetitive Strain Injury: the Institution and the Individual: the University of Melbourne Experience.’ In Conference on Women and Health (2nd: 1985: South Australian College of Advanced Education). Women’s Health in a Changing Society: Proceedings. 1986.

Co-author: Cheryl McKinna.

 

Burke, Alan. Interview Alan Burke, 1988.

Burke speaks of his family background; education; early memories of the theatre ; experiences at Melbourne University and influence of Manning Clark and Joseph Burke; early interest and beginnings in the theatre; first productions and work in Melbourne, Sydney and Canberra in 1950’s; experiences travelling in United States and England under a scholarship, influences, productions; working in television at the BBC; writing the play Lola Montez, productions and staging; actors; musicals; his career in television in Australia; productions he has been involved with; teaching at NIDA; attitudes of young actors; experiences with TV productions.

Interviewers: Michelle Potter and Bill Stephens for the National Library of Australia. Esso Australia and Esso Performing Arts and Oral History Archive Project.

Inquiries to the National Library of Australia.

 

Burke, Joseph Terence. “Correspondence and Lectures.” 30 archives boxes, 1937-1973.

Educated at the Universities of London and Yale, Burke had been Assistant Keeper at the Victoria and Albert Museum and had spent the war years on secondment to the Home Office before being appointed Herald Professor of Fine Arts at the University of Melbourne in April 1946, initially for three years. He held the post from 1947 until retirement in 1979. On giving the money to found the Herald Chair in 1945 (the offer had first been made in September 1944), Sir Keith Murdoch wrote that it should be “or teaching the understanding and appreciation of the fine arts and the application of their principles and practice to the life of the community”.

 

Burke, Joseph Terence. “Papers.” 102 archives boxes, 1961-1978.

 

Burke, Joseph Terence. “Tapes and Transcripts of the Opening of a Tribute to Professor Burke’s Exhibition at the University Gallery.” 72 cm. (6 archives boxes), 1978.

 

Burne, W.C. & Sons. “Bills of Quantities.” 2 vol. foolscap (7 cm.), 1957-1961.

1. Bills of Quantities and Estimate for Alterations and Additions to Union House at Melbourne University. Architects - Eggleston MacDonald and Seccomb, 163 Grattan St Carlton. Quantity Surveyors - Rider Hunt and Partners, 24 Eastern Road, South Melbourne. March 1957; 190 pp. annotated; roneoed, bound in cardboard covers.

2. Bills of Quantities for Construction of Mechanical Engineering School . . . University of Melbourne for the Council of the University. Architects - Stephenson and Turner, 347 Little Collins St Melbourne. Quantity Surveyors - Rider Hunt & Partners, 505 St Kilda Rd Melbourne. June 1961; 185 pp. roneoed and interleaved correspondence at front + one p. MS at rear. Framed photographs of a number of buildings constructed by the firm, including Emily MacPherson Community Hospital and certificates.

 

Burnet, Macfarlane. “Personal Papers.” 65 archives boxes, 1880 to 1985.

Born at Traralgon Victoria in 1899, Burnet was assistant director of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute the University of Melbourne 1928-31 and 1934-44, becoming Director and Professor of Experimental Medicine 1944-1965. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1960, joint, and the Mueller Medal for contributions to science at the 1962 ANZAAS Congress and received various other awards in recognition of his contributions to medicine and science.

 

Burnet, Macfarlane. “Reminiscences.” 7 sheets, 1953-1976.

 

Burnet, Macfarlane. Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, 1915-1965. Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Press, 1971.

 

Burrows, G.H. “Glimpses of A.A. Fitzgerald.” In Essays in Honour of Louis Goldberg, edited by J. St G. Kerr and R.C. Clift. Melbourne: Melbourne University Department of Accounting and Business Law, 1989.

 

Burton, H. “Sir Douglas Copland and the Melbourne Commerce School.” Economic Record. v.36 no.73(1960).

 

Button, John. Melbourne University - Adjustment or Agistment?, Assembly Report; 13. [Parkville]: University of Melbourne University Assembly, 1980.

 

Byrne, Ann-Maritza. “The ‘Human Bulldozer’: Remembering Diana Dyason.” In Melbourne University Mosaic: People and Places, edited by Three-Four-Eight. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1998.

Reader in History and Philosophy of Science. After working as Demonstrator in the Physiology Department form 1943 to 1949, Diana Dyason was appointed to the Department of General Science, later the Department of History and Philosophy of Science. She was appointed Reader in 1965 and served as head of the department for many years.

 

Byrt, W.J. “Melbourne University’s Graduate School of Management.” Australian corporate history bulletin v. 2 no. 2 (1986).

Australian Corporate History Programme

 

Cadman, Sam. “Frederick Thomas James Dickson: The Fraudulent Accountant and His University.” In Melbourne University Portraits: They Called It ‘the Shop’, edited by Paper-Clip Collective. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1996.

Dickson, the son of a Melbourne merchant, was the Accountant at the University of Melbourne from 1892 to 1901, when he was arrested for fraud and sentenced to 5 years’ imprisonment.

 

Cahill, Danielle. “Political Ensembles: Graham Little and the Psycho-Social Group.” In Melbourne University Characters and Controversies, edited by Chiaroscuro: Department of History, University of Melbourne, 2001.

Little was born in Belfast, migrating to Melbourne when 15. He was educated at Melbourne High School, Melbourne University and Australian National University, and also trained overseas. He taught Political Science at Melbourne University over a period of 30 years, and died suddenly on 24 February 2000, aged 60

 

Cahn, Audrey. University Children. Warrandyte, Vic.: A. Cahn, 1987.

Cahn is the daughter of W.A. Osborne

 

Cain, Neville. “Economics between the Wars: a Tall Poppy as Seedling.” Australian cultural history. no.3(1984).

 

Caldwell, Zoe. Conversation with Zoe Caldwell, 1970.

Interviewer: Hazel De Berg.

Caldwell, author of the autobiographical I Will Be Cleopatra (2002), joined the Union Theatre Repertory Company (later Melbourne Theatre Company) at 17. She has enjoyed enormous success overseas, notably in Medea and as Maria Callas in Masterclass.

Inquiries to the National Library of Australia.

 

Callinan, Bernard. Sir John Monash, Daniel Mannix Memorial Lecture; 1980. Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Press, 1981.

 

Caldicott, Beth. Recorded Interview. Melbourne, 1992.

Interviewer:  Carolyn Rasmussen for the History of the University Unit

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Cameron, Roy. “Recollections of Sir Harry Brookes Allen.” In University of Melbourne. Department of Pathology. The Melbourne School of Pathology : Phases and Contrasts. [Parkville, Vic.: The Dept.], 1962.

 

“Campaign against Professor Marshall Hall.” 1.5 cm. 1900.

Seventy notes printed with the words: “I, the undersigned Headmistress of .... Girls’ School in Victoria, beg to enter my strong protest against the re-appointment of Professor Marshall Hall to the Ormond Chair of Music in the University of Melbourne”. Each has the name of a school inserted and is signed by the Headmistress. A very few are dated (14-15 June 1900) . With the notes is an alphabetical listing of the Headmistresses with addresses. 2 pp. One has been folded, stamped, and addressed to Dr. Leeper, Trinity College.

 

Campbell, Dianne. “Bella Guerin M A: ‘First Female Graduate’.” In A Chequered Past: Pieces of Melbourne University, edited by Millennium Scholars. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 2000.

Guerin (1858-1923),  was born in Williamstown, Victoria, passed the matriculation examination in 1878 and entered the University of Melbourne in 1881, the first year women were permitted to do. She became the first woman graduate there, B A 1883, M A 1885, and in 1891 married Henry Halloran with whom she had a son, also Henry. After his death in 1893 she returned to teaching (which was interrupted by a short-lasting marriage to G.D.Lavender) and became a political activist for women and socialism.

 

Campbell, Kate. “A Medical Life: An Interview with Dame Kate Campbell.” In The Half-Open Door : Sixteen Modern Australian Women Look at Professional Life and Achievement, edited by Patricia Grimshaw and Lynne Strahan. Sydney, N.S.W.: Hale & Iremonger, 1982.

Campbell’s interest in pediatrics was sparked by her work with Vera Scantlebury Brown, who established the Victorian Baby Health Centres Association. Her  major discovery was the link between excessive oxygen supply in humidicribs and retrolental fibroplasia, a disease which causes blindness in premature babies.

 

Campbell, Margaret. University Women’s College, a Record of Events of 1937, the First Year. Parkville, Vic: University College Association, 1988.

The foundation stone of Women’s College (now known as University College) was laid in 1937 by Lady Huntingdon, wife of the Governor-General. In August 1938 the College had 42 students and 4 residential tutors. Although originally a college for women, in 1975 the Council passed a minute giving the Principal the discretion to enrol men, providing that there were no suitable women applicants. Since that date, the College has grown as a place of residence and learning for both men and women while still retaining a mission to ensure that women have every encouragement to attain their full personal and scholarly potential. Whilst mainly a College for undergraduate students, University College has always encouraged enrolments of overseas and postgraduate residents.

 

Campbell, Ruth. A History of the Melbourne Law School, 1857 to 1973. Parkville, Vic.: Faculty of Law University of Melbourne, 1977.

 

Campbell, Shirley. “Ambition and Apprenticeship: Enid Derham, Poet and Student.” In Melbourne University Portraits: They Called It ‘the Shop’, edited by Paper-Clip Collective. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1996.

Derham, a Melbourne graduate, lectured in English between 1922 and 1941. In 1912 she published The Mountain Road and Other Verses and Empire ( a children’s play).

 

Carbines, Louise. ‘Changing Role of Nuns in the World: Admiring Glances.’ Age. 7 Feb 1987.

Professor Margaret Manion, nun and first female Chair of Melbourne University Academic Board.

 

Carbines, Louise. “Louise Carbines.” In Memories of Melbourne University: Undergraduate Life in the Years since 1917, edited by Hume Dow. Richmond, Vic.: Hutchinson of Australia, 1983.

Carbines graduated in English and Fine Arts in 1979 and was involved in student theatre and worked on Farrago. She became a journalist, winning the Graham Perkin Scholarship for cadet journalists.

 

Carey, Jane. “Barriers Unknown? Margaret Blackwood’s Life in Science.” 4th year thesis, University of Melbourne, 1995.

 

———. Women and Science at the University of Melbourne : Reflections on the Career of Dame Margaret Blackwood, Working Papers / the University of Melbourne. History of the University Project; No. 2. Parkville, Vic.: The University of Melbourne History of the University Project, 1996.

 

Carey, Jane. Women Historians and Women’s History : Kathleen Fitzpatrick (1905-1990), Margaret Kiddle (1914-1958) and the Melbourne History School, Working Paper / University of Melbourne. History of the University Project; No. 5. Carlton, Vic.: Dept. of History University of Melbourne, 2001.

By Jane Carey,  Patricia Grimshaw, and Heather M. Gunn

 

Cargill, Barbara Joan. “Leadership in Institutions of Higher Education, 1988-1991 : On the Experience of Coping with Crises.” M Ed, University of Melbourne, 1995.

 

Carkeek, M. “No Stone Unturned: In Search of Professor Sir Frederick McCoy FRS.” The Victorian historical journal 69, no. 1 (1998): 24-39.

McCoy was appointed Professor of Natural Science in 1885. His teaching methods were theoretical rather than practical, depending on classroom exposition rather than field work. McCoy’s chief interest was in museums and having carried the entire collection of the Government Museum to his rooms in 1856, he was gazetted to the unpaid position of Director of the Museum of Natural and Applied Sciences the following year. A protracted battle for the construction of a museum within the University grounds was won in 1862 and the building (which after his death became the Student Union) opened in 1864.

 

Carmody, Peter. “Nothing Like Experience.” 1970. Duplicate negative and sound track; 16 mm; running time 50 minutes.

Carmody’s film ‘Nothing Like Experience’ was commissioned by the Council of the Student Union and the SRC to record the major activities of the University Arts Festival, May 1969.

 

Caro, David. ‘Leslie Harold Martin: 1900/1983.’ Historical records of Australian science. v.7 no. 1(Dec 1987).

Co-author R. L. Martin.

Includes bibliography of his publications.

 

Caro, David. ‘Leslie Harold Martin: 21 December 1900/1 February 1983.’ Biographical memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society. v. 33(1987).

Co-authors R. L. Martin and Sir Mark Oliphant.

Includes bibliography of his publications.

 

Caro, David. “Papers.” 276 cm. 23 archives boxes, 1981-1987.

Appointment diaries 1983-1987; Australian Department of Science and Technology Antarctic Research Policy Advisory Committee (ARPAC) papers (Caro Chairman), 1981 - April 1985 (minutes, reports, workshop papers, with some correspondence from February 1979); Working Party to review the composition of Councils of Victorian Universities, established by the Minister of Education I. Cathie in December 1985, correspondence, reports May 1987; S.S.A.U. minutes and papers 1981-1987; A.V.C.C. papers; speeches; Christmas cards.

Having graduated B.Sc. and M.Sc. at the University of Melbourne , his course interrupted by service in the R.A.A.F. Caro studied in Birmingham with Oliphant and Moon for his Ph.D. In 1952 he became a Lecturer in Physics at Melbourne, rising to occupying the Chair of Experimental Physics in 1961. In 1972 he was the University’s first full-time Deputy Vice-Chancellor, leaving to become Vice-Chancellor at the University of Tasmania in 1978. He succeeded Sir David Derham as Vice-Chancellor at Melbourne in July 1982.

 

Caro, David. Recorded Interview. Melbourne.

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Caro, David. Discussions Concerning Physics. Melbourne, 1993.

Participants: Edmund Muirhead, J.R. Poynter, Almaya Alvarez and Roderick Weir Home. Interviewer: Carolyn Rasmussen for the History of the University Unit.

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Carrington, Rose. In the Supreme Court of Victoria, 1948 No. 7, between Rose Carrington, Appellant (Plaintiff) and James McColl (Trading as McColl Bros.) and the University of Melbourne, Respondents (Defendants) : Appeal Book, 60 leaves, bound (1948).

Typescript (processed)

Cover title.

“C.M.S. Power, Public Solicitor for Victoria ... Solicitor for the Appellant. Walter Kemp & Townsend ... Solicitors for the Respondent James McColl. Purves & Purves ... Solicitors for the respondent The University of Melbourne.”

 

Carre Riddell Family. “Memorabilia of Consett Carre Riddell at the University of Melbourne.” 2 cms. 1875-1915.

Includes Rules of the University Club, Melbourne; Post cards of the University and the Engineering Camp, Allansford, 1909; University Annual Commencement Program 1912; Melbourne University Rifles Anniversary Dinner 1914, and results of competition; University of Melbourne War Lectures no. 2, 1915.

 

Carter, Barbara. Honours Degrees at Melbourne University : A Theme with Many Variations. [Melbourne: University of Melbourne], 1987.

 

Castles Stephenson and Turner (Firm). [Extension to School of Physics, University of Melbourne], 1996.

Slides showing plans, work in progress and completion of the extension to the School of Physics at University of Melbourne. The architects were Castles, Stephenson and Turner.

 

Catalini, Consuela. “Controversies Ancient and Modern: The Predicament of George William Louis Marshall-Hall.” In Melbourne University Portraits: They Called It ‘the Shop’, edited by Paper-Clip Collective. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1996.

Marshall-Hall was appointed the first Ormond Professor of Music for five-year terms in 1890 and 1895 respectively. Publication of his verses, denounced as erotic and atheistic, led to the University Council refusing to renew his appointment in 1900. The Conservatorium of Music he had established in 1895 (the Albert Street Conservatorium and more recently the Melba Conservatorium) continued in competition with that established by the University for his successor. He was re-appointed to the Chair in 1914 but died in the following year.

 

Cave, Donald. Percy Jones, Priest, Musician, Teacher. Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Press, 1988.

By Donald Cave and Percy Jones.

Ordained in 1937, Jones was appointed Music Director at St Patrick’s Cathedral in 1942. He occupied this position for thirty-one years. From 1950 to 1972 he was also Vice-Director of the Conservatorium. During the 1940s, Jones began collecting Australian folksongs. His 1942 Australian Hymnal was later replaced by his Pius X Hymnal. During the 1950s, he was a driving force in the establishment of the Victorian Schools Music Association, the National Music Camp Association and the Australian Youth Orchestra. During the 1960s, he was a member of the Liturgy Commission of the Second Vatican Council. On his retirement in 1979, he was made a Foundation Fellow of the Melbourne College of Divinity, in recognition of his contribution to the Ecumenical Movement.

 

Cayley, James. “Hit Hard and Often: The Melbourne University Rifles and the League of National Security.” In Melbourne University Mosaic: People and Places, edited by Three-Four-Eight. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1998.

The Melbourne University Rifles was raised 5 March 1910 to provide military training for members of the University and Public Schools of Melbourne and Geelong. Prior to this, after 1884, the University had provided the base for a company of the Mount Alexander Battalion of Volunteer Rifles. The present unit was raised 1 April 1948.

 

Chambers, Donald. “A History of Ormond College 1881-1945.” MA, University of Melbourne, 1966.

The College was built, by resolution of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of Victoria, to serve as a college of residence for students attending the University, and as a theological hall for the training of candidates for the ministry. Bearing the name of its chief benefactor, Francis Ormond, it opened to students in 1881. From 1885, women were among the non-resident students taking advantage of the tutorials offered by the College, and in 1973 were admitted as residents.

 

Chambers, Donald. Theological Teaching and Thought in the Theological Hall of the Presbyterian Church of Victoria, 1865-1906: Theological Hall, Ormond College, 1967.

 

Chambers, Thomas Carrick. “Papers.” 38 archives boxes, 1953-1985.

Include Central Building Planning Committee 1966-1980; Advisory Board of Botany 1969-De Belder collection correspondence and 3 volume catalogue.

Chambers, a graduate of New Zealand, Melbourne and Sydney who had held various academic posts in Auckland and Sydney and studied with the C.S.I.R.O and at Cambridge, became Lecturer in Botany at the University of Melbourne in 1961. Promoted to Senior Lecturer in 1964, he became Professor in 1967. He was prominent on committees within and outside the University. He resigned to become Director of the Royal Botanical Gardens in Sydney.

 

Chambers, Thomas Carrick. “Papers.” 37 boxes (23 standard, 14 of AA size + l oversized volume), 19--.

 

Chambers, Thomas Carrick. “Papers.” 162 cm (8NAA boxes + 1 MUA box), 1961-1989.

Includes official, personal correspondence and memoranda, incl. Chair of Botany, 1962-89;  International Committee Review of Botany School 1986,  Photographic negatives, black and white: University Grounds 1967-86; Miegunyah.

 

Chang, Rosemary. Postgraduate Coursework Fee-Paying and Quality Control at the University of Melbourne 2001 : PELS and Quality. [Melbourne]: The University of Melbourne Postgraduate Association, 2001.

 

Channell, Ian Brackenbury “Papers.” 12 cm, 1972-1973.

Open letters written by Channell, as the Wizard, to the Vice- Chancellor, the Anglican Primate and others. Published works by Channell.

Ian Brackenbury Channell, known as ‘The Wizard’, flourished at the University of Melbourne 1970-73. Apparently funded by the Student Union, he was given premises to establish a Department of Levity in which he formulated ‘alternative’ scientific and social theories, and undertook writings and activities debunking political and ideological beliefs, writing a series of open letters to dignitaries and others, and self-publishing a number of works. Some of his activities took the form of creating diversions in order to subvert or defuse serious political protest meetings.

 

“Charles James Martin.” Journal of Pathology and Bacteriology. v.71 no.21(1956).

 

Charlesworth, Hilary. Recorded Interview. Melbourne, 2002.

Interviewer: Carolyn Rasmussen.

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Cherry, T. M. “Papers.” 3 archives boxes + wooden cases containing telescope & tripod c8’+6, 1919-1973.

Include Cherry’s application to Melbourne 1928; University of Melbourne administrative files; photographs 1919-73; newscuttings 1920-66; publications in the Trinity magazine 1922; obituary notices; land telescope and tripod.

Thomas Macfarland Cherry was born in 1898 and educated at the University of Melbourne and Cambridge University. In 1924 he was appointed temporary Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics at Manchester University and in 1927 he deputised for C.G. Darwin at the University of Edinburgh. From 1925

Cherry also delivered a series of advanced lectures in Mathematics at Cambridge. In 1929 he was appointed Professor of Mathematics at the University of Melbourne where he remained until his retirement in 1963.

 

Cherry, T. M. “Papers.” 9 archives boxes, 1913-1966.

Include lecture notes at the University of Melbourne 1930-1963; University of Melbourne administration files 1950-1963; staff and examination lists 1938-1962; planning and development files 1961-1963.

 

Cherry, T. M. “Papers [in the Basser Library Australian Academy of Science.]

Including citation at the conferring of his honorary  DSc at the ANU, other biographical material incldung tributes by K. E. Bullen, G. Tenple and E. R. Love

 

Cherry, T. M. Secondary School Education in Victoria : Report on the A and B Class System of the University of Melbourne. Melbourne: Melbourne University Press, 1930.

 

Chick, Harriette. “Charles James Martin, 1866-1955.” In Biographical Memoirs of the Fellows of the Royal Society, 1956. v. 2. London: 1956.

 

Childers, Hugh Culling Eardley. “Letters, Extracts from Newspapers, Relating to Childer’s Role in Founding the University.” 1 cm. 1881-1882.

Childers (1827-1896), was born in London and educated at Cambridge University where he graduated B A in 1850 and M A in 1857. In 1850 he emigrated to Victoria and was subsequently appointed member of the National Board of Education, Immigration Agent and then Auditor- General of Victoria in 1853. In his official capacity as Collector of Customs, Childers conducted the bill for the establishment of the University of Melbourne. He returned to England in 1857 as the First Agent-General of the Colony. From 1860 to 1885, Childers was member for Prontefract in the House of Commons and then returned for South Edinburgh from 1886 to 1895 and remained Gladstone’s ardent supporter.

The originals of these documents were sent from England to the University in an ebony and silver casket, which accompanied a bust of Childers. Lauchlan Mackinnon, a partner in the “Argus” organised the fund for the bust of honour Childers role in founding the University, and gathered recollections of the foundation from Childers and Bishop Barry.

 

Childers, Spencer. The Life and Correspondence of the Right Hon. Hugh C. E. Childers, 1827-1896. London: Murray, 1901.

 

Chinner, J. H. Forestry at the University of Melbourne, 1943-80. Parkville [Vic]: University of Melbourne, 1980.

Report prepared by the Forestry Section of the Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry for the occasion of the retirement of the Dean Mr J.H. Chinner.

 

Chisholm, A. R. The Familiar Presence and Other Reminiscences. Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Press, 1966.

Chisholm (1888-1981), was born in Bathurst and educated at Sydney University and the Paris Institute. On his return he was a lecturer in modern languages at the Teachers’ College in Sydney and then served in the AIF during World War One. Chisholm was appointed lecturer-in-charge of French from 1921-1937 and Professor of French in 1938. He retired in 1957.

Includes ‘Augustin Lodewyckx’.

 

Chisholm, A. R. Men Were My Milestones : Australian Portraits and Sketches. Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Press, 1958.

 

Chisholm, A. R. “Papers in the University of Melbourne Archives.” Melbourne.

 

Chisholm, A. R. “Reminiscences.” 1 cm. 1975.

 

Christesen, C. B. Conversation with Clem Christesen, 1961.

Christesen, a University of Queensland graduate, founded Meanjin in 1940 and edited it until 1974. In 1945 he accepted the invitation of the University of Melbourne to transfer it to Melbourne.

Interviewer: Hazel De Berg.

Inquiries to National Library of Australia.

 

Christesen, C. B. “Notes of Discussion.” Melbourne, 1992.

Interviewer: Carolyn Rasmussen for the History of the University Unit.

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Christesen, Nina. “A Russian Migrant.” In The Half-Open Door : Sixteen Modern Australian Women Look at Professional Life and Achievement, edited by Patricia Grimshaw and Lynne Strahan. Sydney, N.S.W.: Hale & Iremonger, 1982.

Nina Mikhailovna Christesen (1911-2001), began teaching Russian under the auspices of the French Department, and in 1946, founded Australia’s first Department of Russian. The difficulties facing her ranged from a lack of textbooks, qualified staff and even a set of type from which examination papers could be printed, to opposition from colleagues who accused her of Communist sympathies.

 

Christesen, Nina. Recorded Interview. Melbourne, 1992.

Interviewer: Carolyn Rasmussen for the History of the University Unit.

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Christian Social Action. “Minute Book 17 May - 10 September 1951.” 2 cm. 1951.

Created in 1951 by a group of Christian students from the University of Melbourne who were concerned with the state of Australian society.

 

Christie, G.S. “The Teaching of Pathology.” In University of Melbourne. Department of Pathology. The Melbourne School of Pathology : Phases and Contrasts. [Parkville, Vic.: The Dept.], 1962.

 

Churchward, Lloyd Gordon. “Papers.” 33 archives boxes, 1945-1982.

Churchward graduated B A (Hons) in the School of History, M A in 1941, Dip. Ed. in 1941. After teaching history at Knox Grammar School, Sydney, in 1945 he became Acting-Lecturer (in 1946 Lecturer) in Political Science while working also as tutor at his old College, Queen’s. He rose to be Reader in his department, retiring February 1981. In July of that year he was awarded the degree of Litt.D. for his published works

 

Cigler, Michael J. Interview with Michael Cigler, Multicultural Historian and Educator, 1989.

Michael Cigler speaks with Barry York of his experiences as a Czech immigrant in Australia, career in education and interest in multicultural affairs. He describes his early years in Czechoslovakia and German occupation; escape to West Germany after WWII; living as a refugee; first impressions of Australia; life and social conditions in Bonegilla immigrant camp; Australian pub culture; relations between ethnic  groups at Bonegilla; first jobs and qualifying as a teacher; cultural differences between Australia and Europe; Australian anti-communism movement; student days at Melbourne University, etc.

Inquiries to the National Library of Australia.

 

Clark, Dymphna. Interview with Dymphna Clark, Translator, 1990-1991.

Clark talks with Heather Rusden and Elizabeth Cham about her early family life; early memories of Durban, South Africa and influence of her Swedish grandmother. In 1933 she spent a year of study in Germany attending Madchenreformreal gymnasium an der Luisenstrasse in  Munich and she gives her impressions of Germany at the time. This was followed by studying German at Melbourne University and then in 1938 Clark returned to  Germany to study at Bonn University and she describes the changes seen at the time. She gives her impressions of Melbourne University and its teachers, etc.

Inquiries to the National Library of Australia.

 

Clark, Jennifer. ‘Abschol, More Than a Scholarship Scheme.’ National Library of Australia News. v.12 no.1(Oct 2001).

 

Clark, Laurel. ‘F. F. Bailliere book seller to the University of Melbourne.’ University of Melbourne Library journal. v.6 no.2(Dec 2000).

 

Clark, Manning. “Papers [in the National Library of Australia] 27.44 m.1907-1992.

Correspondence, diaries, notebooks, personal documents, newspaper cuttings, photographs, printed ephemera, research materials and  manuscripts and typescripts of Clark’s books, articles, reviews, lectures, addresses and speeches. The bulk of the collection comprises private papers.  Series 16-18, occupying 102 boxes, relate to “A history of Australia”,  including the original manuscripts and typescripts, research materials, reviews and correspondence with publishers, friends and readers. The correspondence mostly dates from 1950 to 1991 and is very extensive. The correspondents include Kathleen Fitzpatrick, R. M. Crawford, John La Nauze, Keith Hancock, Ken Inglis, and Helen Garner.

Clark studied History at the University of Melbourne, going on to Balliol College, Oxford from 1938 to 1940. After four years teaching at Geelong Grammar School, he returned to the University to teach Politics. In 1946 he was recruited by R.M. Crawford to establish the first course in Australian History. In 1949 he became the first Professor of History at what was to become the Australian National University. He held this post until 1975.

 

Clark, Manning. The Quest for Grace. Melbourne: Viking, 1990.

 

Clark, Manning. Occasional Writings and Speeches. Melbourne: Fontana/Collins, 1980.

Includes “A Tribute to My Friend Robert Noel Ebbels, 1918-52” and “On First Seeing Ian Turner.”

 

Clark, Robert William. Recorded Interview. Melbourne, 2002.

Liberal Member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly. As a student was active in the Young Liberal Movement and Australian Liberal Students’ Federation.

Interviewer: Carolyn Rasmussen.

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Clark, W.E. Le Gros. “Frederic Wood Jones, 1879-1954.” In Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society, 1956. v.2. London: 1956.

 

Clarke, Adrienne Elizabeth. Interview with Adrienne Clarke, Botanist, Professor of Botany, University  of Melbourne and Chair of CSIRO, 1991-1996, 1996. sound recording.

Clarke majored in biochemistry at University of Melbourne and later completed her doctorate there. She became an international expert on plant biology, researching the molecular basis for self-incompatibility and the function in plants of arabinogalactan proteins. Interviewer: Ragbir Singh Bhathal.

Inquiries to the National Library of Australia.

 

Clarke, Ian. “Photographs of System Garden, Taken as a Basis for Planning Future Development of the Garden.” 1986.

Include views of the building site of the new Zoology School.  37 colour prints, glossy, each 5x7”. Each is labeled by Ian Clarke on the back.

The System Garden was established in 1856 by Frederick McCoy.

 

Clarke, Simone. “The Young and the Wealthy: New Students in 1856.” In Students, Scholars and Structures: Early Tales from the University of Melbourne, edited by The Special Collection. Melbourne: History Department, University of Melbourne, 2002.

 

Clarkson, Gerald Thomas. “The Life and Veterinary Contribution of Dr. Harold E. Albiston.” M Ed, University of Melbourne, 1993.

Albiston (1897-1994) was educated at the University of Melbourne (1918). CBE 1963. Walter and Eliza Hall Institute Fellowship 1920-23, Officer in charge, Victorian Milk Testing Laboratory 1923-, Lecturer, University of Melbourne veterinary school 1920-27. Director, Veterinary Research Institute, 1929-63. Chaired the committee recommending the reopening of the veterinary school, 1957. Gilruth Prize 1959. President, Australian Veterinary Association 1933-34, President, Victorian Veterinary Association 1934.

Albiston was the longest-serving member of the Veterinary Science Faculty of the University of Melbourne, from 1922-69, the longest-serving member of the board of the Royal Melbourne Zoological Gardens, 1938-81, the longest-serving honorary editor of the Australian Veterinary Journal 1939-62, director of the Veterinary Research Institute, Parkville, for 32 years, and a member of the Veterinary Board of Victoria for 33 years.

 

Clements, M. A. “Frank Tate and the Politics of Agricultural Education in Victoria, 1895-1905.” In Melbourne studies in education. 1977.

 

Clements, McK. A. “Relationship between the University of Melbourne and the Secondary Schools of Victoria, 1890-1912.” PhD, University of Melbourne, 1980.

 

Close, Cecily. “The Presbyterian Attitude to the “Education Question” in 1850-1872.” 4th year thesis, University of Melbourne, 1961.

 

Close, Cecily. “1906 – the University’s Jubilee.” University of Melbourne Library Journal. v.5 no.1(1999).

 

Club Italiano (University of Melbourne). Scarabocchio : Il Giornale Del Club Italiano. Melbourne: Club Italiano (University of Melbourne), 1993.

 

Coaldrake, Frank. “Papers.” 24 cm. (2 archives boxes), 1939-1945.

Correspondence regarding pacifism, peace and the publication, Peacemaker; Christian Pacifist Movement circulars and correspondence; Peace Pledge Union correspondence and circulars.

A student activist and conscientious objector during World War Two, Frank Coaldrake was a member of the Australian Student Christian Movement, and the Australian Peace Pledge Union. He was also editor of the Peacemaker, secretary of the Christian Pacifist Movement Committee for Conscientious Objectors to Military Service and president of the National Union of Australian Students.

 

Coates, Albert Ernest. Departments of Medicine and Surgery in the Melbourne University, Halford Oration; 19th, 1953. 1953.

Albert Coates (1895-1997) was born in Ballarat, the eldest of seven children. He served with great distinction and devotion to his patients in both world wars. From 1925 to 1935 he worked at the Melbourne Hospital and from 1925-1940 he lectured in anatomy at the University. He worked as honorary surgeon to inpatients at RMH, lectured in surgery at the University and was instrumental in the establishment of chairs of Medicine and Surgery. He was at various times president of the Melbourne Rotary Club, Council member of the University and a member of the Board of Management of the Fairfield Infectious Diseases Hospital. After retirement from medical practice in 1971, he published The Albert Coates Story in 1977.

Although he practised as a general surgeon, Coates was aware of the changes and advances in surgical practice and encouraged both research and specialisation in his juniors. He was awarded a an O.B.E. in 1946, an honorary doctorate of laws in 1962. He was knighted in 1955 and elected a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, London in 1953.

 

Coats Patons (Australia). The New Yorker Love Story, Book; 647. Mt. Waverley, Vic.:

Coats Patons (Australia). Eight knitting patterns for a 12-ply yarn called New Yorker

Illustrations photographed on the University of Melbourne campus.

 

Cobb, Victor. “Wilson Hall.” 1 etching

The original Wilson Hall was destroyed by fire on 25 January 1952.

 

Cohan, Margaret, Deborah Stephan. Practical Aspects of Producing a Thesis at the University of Melbourne; a Thesis Submitted in Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 2nd ed. [Melbourne]: University of Melbourne Postgraduate Association, University of Melbourne, 1993.

 

Cohn, Helen M. “Some Foundations of Science in Victoria in the Decade after Separation.” MA, University of Melbourne, 1990.

 

Cole, A. G. “Other Aspects of University Administration: Buildings and Services: Organisation and Operation.” Paper presented at the University Administrative Staff Course, [Melbourne] 1970.

 

Cole-Adams, Kate. “War and Peace: Profile of Helen Garner.” Time Australia. no.18(8 May 1995).

 

Collegial Leadership in a Competitive Environment : Pre-Conference Booklet : 13th-15th February, 1992, Ambassador Hotel, Geelong. [Parkville, Vic.]: The University of Melbourne, 1992.

 

Collins, Bernadette. “An Investigation into the Employment Expectations and Experiences of Arts Graduates of the University of Melbourne.” M Ed, University of Melbourne, 1999.

 

Colman, G. S. “Graduates in Commerce.” Economic record. v.36 no.73(1960).

 

“Commerce Staff and Students Photographs.” 1927.

Two photographs in one frame: Teaching staff of Commerce School; first Commerce graduates, with signatures. The latter graduated 9 April 1927.

 

Committee of Review of the Department of Zoology. Review of the Department of Zoology. [Parkville, Vic.]: University of Melbourne Department of Zoology, 1988.

 

Committee of Review of the Horwood Language Centre Review of the Horwood Language Centre. Parkville, Vic.: University of Melbourne Dept. of Classical and Near Eastern Studies, 1991.

Chair: E. Gauntlett.

 

Committee of Review of the School of Chemistry. Report of the Committee of Review of the School of Chemistry: University of Melbourne Faculty of Science, 1989.

 

Committee of University Women. “Papers.” 6 cm. 1925-1941.

Minutes recording social functions arranged by the undergraduate committee 1925-1933, 1937-1941; accounts.

The Committee consisted of undergraduate representatives of the Faculties, one member representing the Professors’ wives and another representing the University staff. It arranged social functions to raise money for the University.

 

Commons (F.W.) & Son, Sculptors. “ Drawing for the Foundations of the “Disher Memorial”, Stratford (I.E. Nuntin) Cemetery.” 1935.

Harold Clive Disher, who graduated M.B.B.S. in 1916 and M.D. in 1921, having been a student at Ormond College, left his property “Strathfieldsaye”, Perry Bridge, Stratford, Victoria to the University when he died in 1976. The “Strathfieldsaye Estate Bequest” included the land, buildings, contents, plant, equipment, stock, cash and securities for the purpose of establishing “The Strathfieldsaye Institute of Teaching and Research in Agriculture and Allied Sciences”.

 

Conference for Deans & Heads (1991: University of Melbourne).Towards a Preferred Future : The University of Melbourne’s Next Three Years. Melbourne, Vic.: The University of Melbourne, 1991

 

Cook, Gillian. “ Social Work III, September 1958. Some Students of That Class Waiting for Their Lecturer.” 1958. 1 snapshot.

Names, place and date are noted on the back.

 

Cooke, Maxwell. “Some Thoughts on the Faculty of Music, Written in Response to a Suggestion from Professor John Poynter.” 20 A4 pp. 1993.

“Early Music”, 24 June 1993, 4 pp. “Music Therapy”, 26 June 1993, 4 pp.  “The War, and Immediate Post-War Years”, 27 June 1993, 3 pp.  “The Establishment of the Victorian College of the Arts”, 19 July 1993, 9 pp.

Cooke, a graduate in Music from the University of Melbourne was Dean of the Faculty of Music for 6 years. He  leads the acclaimed Team of Pianists and is a renowned solo performer on piano and harpsichord.

 

Copland, Douglas Berry. “Papers [in the National Library of Australia].” 16 m. Canberra, 1920-1970.

Photographs covering all stages of his family early life and career. Press cuttings and plans of houses and furniture. Also includes diaries, research notes, cuttings, articles lectures and correspondence.

Copland was successively Professor of Economics at the University of Tasmania, Professor of Commerce at Melbourne University, Economic Consultant to Prime Minister John Curtin, Commonwealth Prices Commissioner, Australian Minister to China, first Vice-Chancellor of the Australian National University, High Commissioner to Canada and first Principal of the Australian Administrative Staff College.

 

Copland, Douglas Berry. W. E. Hearn: First Australian Economist. Melbourne: Cheshire, 1935.

 

Copland, Douglas Berry. Giblin: the Scholar and the Man. Melbourne: Cheshire, 1960.

 

Coppel, Marjorie. “Papers.” 2 cm. 1945-1970.

Six lectures on Women’s’ Affairs given by Coppel 1945 to 1970; biographical note.

Coppel (nee Service) was an Arts student at the University of Melbourne and the Women’s’ Vice-President of the SRC. She graduated L.L.B in 1924 and in the following year married Elias Coppel (lecturer in law). Marjorie Coppel (author of modern history texts for secondary schools) was an active member of “The Catalysts”, an association of intellectual, professional and artistic women who met regularly for dinners at the Lyceum Club.

 

Corbett, A.H. “Kernot: The Man among His Students.” University of Melbourne gazette 8 (1962): 205.

Kernot (1845-1909) was Melbourne University’s first qualified engineer, first alumnus to be awarded a Chair and its foundation Professor of Engineering .He chaired the Royal Society of Victoria 1885 -1900 and the Council of the Working Men’s College from 1889. Both College and University benefited from his generosity. As Chairman of Directors of the New Australian Electricity Co, he brought electric light to Melbourne.

 

Cossins, Anne. ‘On stone throwing from the feminist sidelines: a critique of Helen Garner’s book The First Stone.’ Melbourne University law review. v.20 no.2(Dec 1995).

 

Course, Laurence. Professor Emeritus Sir Joseph Burke, K.B.E. : Foundation Professor of the Herald Chair of Fine Arts at the University of Melbourne, 1947-1979. [Melbourne]: Victorian Artists’ Society, 1992.

Educated at the Universities of London and Yale, Burke had been Assistant Keeper at the Victoria and Albert Museum and had spent the war years on secondment to the Home Office before being appointed Herald Professor of Fine Arts at the University of Melbourne in April 1946, initially for three years. He held the post from 1947 until retirement in 1979.

 

Covell, Roger. Australia’s Music. Melbourne: Sun Books, 1967.

 

Cowen, Zelman. “Papers [in the National Library of Australia].” 34.52 m. (253 boxes) and 33 folio items. Canberra, 1950-1988.

The first part of the collection comprises files, correspondence, speeches and articles relating to Cowen’s work at the Universities of Melbourne, New England and Queensland.

Cowen was Professor of Law, University of Melbourne (1951-66), Vice-Chancellor,

University of New England (1967-69), Vice-Chancellor, University of Queensland (1970-77) Governor-General of Australia (1977-82) and Provost of Oriel College, Oxford University.

 

Cowen, Zelman. The Redmond Barry Centenary Oration. [Melbourne]: Royal Historical Society of Victoria in association with the University of Melbourne and the History Advisory Council of Victoria, 1980.

 

Craven, Bruce Desmond. Early History of Operations Research in Victoria; Talk to the Australian Society of Operations Research, Melbourne Chapter, 19 March 1997, in the Mathematics Department, R.M.I.T. 1997. 1 audio tape and notes.

 

Crawford, Kay. “Leonhard Adam: An Anthropologist Arrives.” In A Chequered Past: Pieces of Melbourne University, edited by Millennium Scholars. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1998.

Adam was born in 1891 in Berlin. He became a district judge, but being part Jewish he sought refuge in London, teaching at the University of London. He published Primitive Art in 1940. Interned as an enemy alien on 16 May 1940, he was shipped to Australia on the “Dunera” and became Pro-rector of the “Collegium Taturense” at the Tatura Internment Camp. Released on parole on 29 May 1942, he taught Primitive Art and Anthropology in the University of Melbourne History Department, 1943-1960, and built up an ethnological collection. He died suddenly of heart disease, in Bonn.

 

Crawford, R.M. “Papers.” 7m (83 archives boxes). Melbourne, 1920-1989.

Correspondence including family, personal, University administration; diaries; notebooks; lecture notes, tutorial notes and synopses taken from Sydney University, Oxford University and the University of Melbourne; research; papers regarding former students; manuscripts; photographs; newspaper clippings.

Crawford (1906-1991), was educated at Sydney High School, University of Sydney and Balliol College, Oxford University. After graduating with an M A he worked in a series of schools in Australia and England. He returned to Sydney when he was appointed lecturer at Sydney University in 1935. Crawford successfully applied for the Chair of History at the University of Melbourne in 1937 and proceeded to implement important and enduring changes. With the Spanish Civil War, he became politically active and joined the A.C.C.L. During this period he was embroiled in a series of controversies. In 1942 Crawford was appointed First Secretary to the Soviet Legation in Moscow. After his return to Melbourne in 1944 he resumed teaching and championing civil liberties. Crawford retired from the University of Melbourne in 1970.

 

Crawford, R.M. Wilson Hall : Centre and Symbol of the University. Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Press, 1952.

 

Crespin, Irene. Ramblings of a Micro-Palaeontologist. Canberra: Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics, 1975.

Crespin graduated BA in 1919. In 1927, she became  assistant to the Commonwealth Palaeontologist Frederick Chapman, succeeding him in 1936. From 1946, her position was attached to the Bureau of Mineral Resources. She was a founding member and President of the Soroptimist Club of Canberra, of which she was made a life member in 1971. Crespin published almost a hundred  papers as sole author and over twenty in collaboration with others, a publication record which won her a D.Sc. from the University of Melbourne.

 

Crew, Jennifer. Recorded Interview, 2002. 1 cassette.

Interviewer: Carolyn Rasmussen.

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Croghan, Emma-Kate. “Love and Other Catastrophes.” 1 videocassette (VHS)(76 min.). [Australia]: 21st Century Pictures, 1996.

Originally released: Australia, 1996.

Producer, Stavros Andonis Efthymiou; director, Emma-Kate Croghan.

Cast includes Francis O’Connor, Alice Garner, Radha Mitchell, Matt Day, Kim Gyngell.

A comedy about love, fate and other pressing concerns. Mia and Alice have just moved into a warehouse apartment but are still minus a housemate. Danni, Mia’s girlfriend is keen to move in, but Mia fears commitment.

 

Crow, Jean. “A Memoir of J. Sutton Crow Written by His Daughter.” 2 pp. 1986.

Crow trained at the Melbourne Conservatorium, was Assistant Secretary and Librarian at the University Conservatorium from 1910, Secretary of the Australian Music Examinations Board from 1919, and of the University Conservatorium from 1920. He retired in 1946.

 

Crow, Vincent. “ A Study of the History Curricula of Professors Wood and Roberts at the University of Sydney and of Professors Scott and Crawford at the University of Melbourne, c. 1910-50.” MEd, University of Sydney, 1986.

 

Crozier, John. “Our Educational System.” Victorian review, v. 5 no. 26(1881).

 

Crozier, Michael. “Society Economised: T. R. Ashworth and the History of the Social Sciences in Australia.” Australian historical studies, no. 119 (2002).

 

Cullen, R. B. “The Administration of Complex Knowledge-Oriented Organizations.” PhD, University of Melbourne, 1971.

Relates to the administration of the University of Melbourne

 

Cuming Smith & Company Ltd. “Personal Papers.” 10 metres, c1910-1988.

Papers of Cuming Smith & Co. and M A Cuming Including MAC’s B.Sc. (Melb.) certificate 1924, etching of University of Melbourne union club building c1922 etc. clubs and societies files, etc.

James Cuming arrived in Melbourne during 1862 and helped establish Cuming, Smith & Co. in 1872 to manufacture acids, and, later, superphosphate. The company joined with others in 1929 to form Commonwealth Fertilizers, acquired by I.C.I.A.N.Z. in 1961. Cuming Smith also had an interest in interstate fertilizer manufacturers, and in sawmilling and wood distillation near Melbourne.

 

Cummins, Kate. “Voices of Dissent: Looking for P.G. Wodehouse in the Farragos of the 1930s.” In Melbourne University Characters and Controversies, edited by Chiaroscuro: Department of History, University of Melbourne, 2001.

 

Cummins, Terry. The Victorian University in the Late Twentieth Century, Assembly Report; 11. Parkville: University of Melbourne, 1978.

 

D’Cruz, Glenn. “Performance Studies as a Discipline? : A Foucauldian Approach to Theory and Practice.” MA, University of Melbourne, 1993.

Theatre and Drama studies at the University of Melbourne.

 

Dale, Leigh. The English Men” Professing English in Australian Universities. Canberra: Association for the Study of Australian Literature, 1967.

 

Dalziell, Rosamund. ‘The shaming of Australian culture: refracted shame in Kathleen Fitzpatrick’s Solid Bluestone Foundations: and other Memories of a Melbourne Girlhood, 1908 to 1928.’ Association for the Study of Australian Literature. Proceedings. no.16(1994).

 

Dare, Robert. “Max Crawford and the Study of History.” In Stuart Macintyre and Julian Thomas, Eds. The Discovery of Australian History, 1890-1939. Carlton, Melbourne University Press, 1995.

 

Darling, Barbara. “Factors in the Development of Theological Education in Victoria in the Early 20th Century:  With Special Reference to Ridley College, 1910-30.” 4th year thesis, University of Melbourne, 1978.

Ridley College was founded in 1910, and is located on the corner of Walker Street and The Avenue. It affiliated with the University of Melbourne in 1966. In 1972 Ridley became co-residential, the first College at the University of Melbourne to do so.

 

 

Darling, James Ralph. “Papers [in the National Library of Australia].” 5.4 m. (39 boxes). Canberra, 1920-1970.

Educationalist and author. Headmaster of Geelong Church of England Grammar School (1930-61). Member of various organisations including Australian Elizabethan Theatre Trust (1973-80), Marcus Oldham Farm Management College, (1962-80s), Australian Frontier Commission (1962-72) and Australian Broadcasting Control Board, 1955-61.

The papers have been arranged into 19 series. The main series include: 1. Australian Frontier, 1962-73. 2. Australian Elizabethan Theatre Trust, 1972-82. 3. Road Safety Council, 1968-83. 4. Marcus Oldham Farm Management College, 1976-89. 5. Australian Broadcasting Commission, 1961-68. The correspondents are Sir Charles Moses and Clem Semmler. 6. Correspondence, 1950-88. The correspondents include Manning Clark, Geoffrey Fairbairn, Brian Hone and Stephen Murray Smith. 7. Writings, including Richly Rewarding (1978).

 

Darling, James Ralph Recorded Interview. Melbourne.

Interviewers: Carolyn Rasmussen and J.R. Poynter for the History of the University Unit

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Darragh, T. “Frederick McCoy.” The fossil collector, no. January (1992): 14-22.

McCoy was appointed in Professor of Natural Science in 1885. His teaching methods were theoretical rather than practical, depending on classroom exposition rather than field work. McCoy’s chief interest was in museums and having carried the entire collection of the Government Museum to his rooms in 1856, he was gazetted to the unpaid position of Director of the Museum of Natural and Applied Sciences the following year. A protracted battle for the construction of a museum within the University grounds was won in 1862 and the building (which after his death became the Student Union) opened in 1864.

 

Daryl Jackson Architects. Architecture and Planning Building Masterplan, the University of Melbourne : Report. [Melbourne: D. Jackson, 1986.

 

Davies, Alan Fraser. “Papers.” 42 archives boxes, 1946-1987.

Files relating to teaching and research in the Political Science Department including: Correspondence; notebooks; reports; working files; notes; articles; reviews; press cuttings; testimonials.

Davies was born in Wangaratta in 1924. He graduated B A 1945, M A 1947, and became a lecturer in 1946. He was appointed to a Chair in March 1968. He became increasingly interested in political psychology and psychoanalysis, particularly dream analysis; and wrote and published short stories. He died 18 August 1987.

 

Davies, Simon. “An Unfinished Building.” In University of Melbourne Characters and Controversies, edited by Chiaroscuro: Department of History, University of Melbourne, 2001.

Relates to the building housing the Faculty of Architecture.

 

Davies, Susan. “Kathleen Fitzpatrick: Sculptor with Words.” In Stuart Macintyre and Julian Thomas, Eds. The Discovery of Australian History, 1890-1939. Carlton, Melbourne University Press, 1995.

 

Davies, Susan Louvain. “Establishing the Martin Committee: A Study of the Setting-up of the Committee and Its Preliminary Discussions.” M Ed, University of Melbourne, 1981.

Committee on the Future of Tertiary Education in Australia.

By Susan Louvain Davies and Leslie Harold Martin.

 

Davies, Susan Louvain. The Martin Committee and the Binary Policy of Higher Education in Australia, Australian Studies in the Social Sciences. Melbourne: Ashwood House, 1989.

Committee on the Future of Tertiary Education in Australia.

 

Davis, D. J. “Seventy-Five Years of Commercial Education in Victoria, 1850-1925.” M Ed, University of Melbourne, 1965.

 

Davison, Graeme. ‘The Melbourne University Social Survey 1941/43.’ Australia 1938-1988: Bicentennial History Project. no.3(1982).

 

Davison, Graeme. ‘Planning the New Social Order: the Melbourne University Social Survey, 1941-1943.’ Australian and New Zealand journal of sociology. v.17(March 1981).

Co-author: John Lack.

 

Day, David. “The History and Politics of Students for a Democratic Society at Melbourne University 1968-1972:  A Case Study of Students Potential for Revolution.” 4th year thesis, University of Melbourne, 1980.

 

De Silva, Amanda. “‘Another Broken Promise’: University of Melbourne Overseas Student Service – the Fight against the Introduction of Fees for Overseas Students.” In A Chequered Past: Pieces of Melbourne University, edited by Millennium Scholars: Melbourne University Department of History, 2000.

The MUOSS was founded to support the Colombo Plan. It is affiliated with the Melbourne University Student Union.

 

Deacon, George Boyd. “An Investigation into Records Management Practices and Policies in the University of Melbourne.” MBA, University of Melbourne, 1976.

 

Deasey, W.D. “The University in 1940-41.” Melbourne University magazine, no. 1969 (1969): 38-41.

 

Delaney, Anne. “Domain Games.” In Four corners (Television program), 1 videocassette (VHS) (44 min.).

Off-air recording of the ABC-TV program broadcast 5/6/2000. Producer, Anne Delaney. Reporter, Stephen McDonell.

Explores the Melbourne IT float and asks whether the University of Melbourne may have undersold its domain names monopoly, which had essentially been a public asset.

 

“Delegates to Conference of the University of Melbourne Extension Board and the Workers’ Educational Association, March 1922.” 1922.

Photograph with negative and key.

 

Den Hartog, Dirk. ‘A Brief Note on Sam Goldberg and “Melbourne English.”’ Critical review. no.32(1992).

 

Denton, Derek A. Professor Derek Denton Interview: Australian Academy of Science in conjunction with Oxford Brookes University Video Archive (United Kingdom) and C & W Optus,. 1998.

This interview with Max Blythe was recorded in Melbourne and was conducted by Dr Max Blythe of the Oxford Brooks University Video Archive.

Denton was born in Launceston, Tasmania, on 27 May 1924. In this interview he talks about his childhood, family, education and the creation of the Florey Institute.

Inquiries to the National Library of Australia.

 

Derham, David P. “The Objectives of a University and Its Role in Society: An Academic Viewpoint.” Paper presented at the University Administrative Staff Course. [Melbourne] 1972.

Derham graduated in Arts in 1941, served in the 2nd A.I.F. (rising to Major), and returned to take a Law Degree. He practised as a barrister, tutored in Law at Queen’s College from 1948 -51, became Independent Lecturer in Constitutional Law at the University in 1949 and Professor of Jurisprudence in 1951. He was Dean of the Law Faculty at Monash University from 1964-68, when he returned to Melbourne as Vice-chancellor. Derham served as Vice-chancellor from 1967 until 1982, when he retired.

 

Derham, David P. “Papers.” 12 archives boxes, 1954-1981.

Personal papers including diaries; invitations 1976-1981; correspondence; AUCC Executive Committee minutes; Law Faculty material i.e. lectures, legal texts, notes; MBE papers i.e. New Guinea seminar and correspondence; reports 1968-1972; University administrative material; Overseas Bureau material.

 

Derham, David P. “Papers.” 8 boxes and 1 roll, 1931-1983.

School memorabilia, family letters, correspondence concerning University matters, copies of talks, further material relating to New Guinea. Proof and agreement regarding 5th edition “Introduction to Law”. New Guinea map in roll 2’ long.

 

Derham, David P. “Papers.” 120 cm. (10 archives boxes), 1955-1984.

Files relating to legal matters and Law School 1955-1967; general correspondence 1964-1979; personal material regarding Scotch College, war service; financial matters; one file 1979-1984; copies of Law Institute Journal.

 

Derham, David P. “Papers.” 12 cm, 1977 - 1985.

Files containing talks and writings; letters of introduction for, and papers relating to, farewell to Professor David Caro; papers relating to Derham’s farewell and to memorial service held after his death; letters from his former secretary, Deirdre Farrell, in reply to letters received after his death.

 

Derham, David P. “Papers Dealing with the University Administration During Derham’s Period as the Professor of Jurisprudence 1957-1963.” 12 cm. 1957-1963.

 

Derham, David P. “Personal Papers.” 7 metres, 1931-1960.

Records of school and university courses and military service; correspondence; accounts; legal opinions; reports on overseas visits; articles; correspondence and lecture notes relating to work as Professor of Jurisprudence.

 

Derham, David P. Recorded Interview.

            Recorded for the History of the University Unit.

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Derham, David P. “Universities, Governments and the Assumption of Federal Responsibility for Higher Education in Australia.” The Australian university. v.13, no. 3 (1975).

 

Derham, Enid. “Wanderings with a Suitcase.” University review. v.1, no. 2(1914).

 

Derham, Rosemary. “Papers.” 24 archives boxes, 1960-1981.

Personal correspondence 1969-1977; banking papers, insurance, household accounts 1959-1978; University functions 1956-1976; general correspondence; invitations; 10th Commonwealth Universities Congress, 1968 papers; miscellaneous University pamphlets; miscellaneous committee and club material; newspaper cuttings; theatre, concert programmes.

 

Derkley, Harry. ‘Hamer Moves to Destroy Student Unions.’ Togatus. v.49(April 1978).

 

Deshon, Janet. “Professor E.J. Nanson: The Closet, the Attic and University House.” In Melbourne University Characters and Controversies, edited by Chiaroscuro. Melbourne: Department of History, University of Melbourne, 2001.

Born in England in 1850, Nanson was appointed Professor of Mathematics at the University of Melbourne in 1875. Widely known as an electoral reformer, he advocated proportional representation and preferential voting and published a series of pamphlets on the subject. Nanson had a life-appointment but negotiated a pension settlement with the University and retired as Emeritus Professor in 1922.

 

Di Lorenzo, Gioconda. “Kathleen Fitzpatrick: ‘the Wings of the Dove’.” In Melbourne University Portraits: They Called It ‘the Shop’, edited by Paper-Clip Collective. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1996.

Fitzpatrick tutored in English, lectured in History, and was appointed Associate Professor in 1948. She retired in 1962. As president of the Council for Women in War Work during WWII, she negotiated with employers on behalf of women students working at Shepparton under Manpower regulations.

 

Di Stefano, Julian. “Energy Efficiency and the Environment : The Potential for Energy Efficient Technology to Save Energy and Reduce Co2 Emissions at Melbourne University, Australia.” M.Env.S. 1999. University of Melbourne, 1999.

 

Dickson, Flora. Recorded Interview. Melbourne, 2002.

Interviewer:  Carolyn Rasmussen for the History of the University Unit

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

“Don’t Send Your Daughter.” 1964? 2 rolls of film. Each film is enclosed in a metal container 14” diameter and 1” thick

Made about the University in “about 1964”. One has a tennis segment in it.

 

“Dorothea Rebecca Coverlid.” 1960? Black and white matt photograph, 5” x 3”, in stiff brown paper folder.

French and German for Science Students was a compulsory subject taught within the Faculty of Science at the University of Melbourne. In 1932-1938 it was taught by tutor Dorothy Rebecca Coverlid Maxwell Dip. Ed.

 

Dorward, Liz. “Major Rowden-White: A Gentleman’s War.” In Melbourne University Mosaic: People and Places, edited by Three-Four-Eight. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1998.

Born in 1876, White was educated at Carlton College under Alexander Sutherland, and at the University of Melbourne. He graduated B.M. in 1900 and M.D. in 1906. From 1900 until 1902 he was at the Fremantle Quarantine Hospital, then demonstrator in bacteriology at the University of Melbourne, Junior Resident Medical Office at the Royal Children’s Hospital and later Senior R.M.O. Children’s and Alfred Hospitals. He was assistant to Dr. Herman Lawrence (dermatologist), Sir Richard Stawell and Mr. Hamilton before practising privately. He served as honorary physician at St. Vincent’s, the Children’s and Melbourne District Nurses After Care Hospitals, and at the Melbourne Foundling Home. He was active in the Royal Australian College of Physicians and the British Medical Association (Aust.). During WWI he served as Major, No.2 Australian General Hospital, Boulogne. He was a benefactor to the Union and the departments of pathology and bacteriology, to hospitals and to the National Theatre Movement. He became C.M.G. in 1952 and knight in 1961. He retired in 1959.

 

Dow, David McKenzie,. “Dow Family Papers.” 29 archive boxes, 1934-1980s.

Includes papers of David McKenzie Dow, Gwyneth Dow, and Hume Dow. David McKenzie Dow report on a history of the Optical Munitions panel, papers relating to court action by Sir Robert Menzies against the Herald and Weekly Times. Correspondence to Hume and Gwyneth Dow, 1934- 1980s. Material relating to University affairs and Faculty of Education course changes. Research notes and drafts of publications including Landfall in Van Dieman’s Land,

David McKenzie Dow was appointed Official Representative of the Commonwealth in the USA in 1924, becoming Acting Commissioner General in 1931 and holding that post until 1938.

Hume Dow, son of DMD, was educated at Staten Island Academy and Harvard University. Returning to Australia he became a journalist and later joined the Army’s Educational Service and editor of Salt. He returned to journalism 1947-1950. After a brief period teaching in England he joined the University of Melbourne as Senior Tutor in English in 1953. He remained at the University until retirement, rising to readership in 1974.

Gwyneth Dow was appointed as a Lecturer in the Faculty of Education in 1958, Senior Lecturer in 1963 and Reader in 1970. She was an inaugural member of the Curriculum Advisory Board in Victoria fostering pilot schemes to introduce curriculum and organisational changes in secondary schooling. She introduced a Dip. Ed. course, “Systems of Education” and was instrumental in introducing an alternative Dip.Ed. course “Course B” which concentrated on method and practical teaching in the first year.

 

Dow, Hume. Memories of Melbourne University: Undergraduate Life in the Years since 1917. Richmond, Vic.: Hutchinson of Australia, 1983.

 

Dow, Hume. More Memories of Melbourne University: Undergraduate Life in the Years since 1919. Melbourne: Hutchinson, 1985.

 

Dow, Hume. “Papers.” 57 archives boxes, 1924-1974.

School exercise books and related material 1924-1934; correspondence, notices and publications received while a student at Harvard 1934-1938; papers concerning the International Peace Campaign 1939-1940 and the Army Educational Service 1941-1946; papers relating to the teaching of Rhetoric at the University, and to the committees and other bodies of which he was a member, including Faculty of the Arts, Buildings Committee, Melbourne University Staff Association and the Australian-Indonesian Association.

 

Dow, Hume. “Papers Relating to University, English Department, Teaching Committees and Extra-Mural Activities.” 4 archives boxes, 1950-1980.

 

Dow, Hume Recorded Interview. Melbourne, 1992.

Participants: Hume and Gwyneth Dow.

Interviewer: Carolyn Rasmussen for the History of the University Unit.

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Dowling, Natalie. “The Scrutiny of Schooling by Inspector Curlewis: a Brief ‘Istory.” In Students, Scholars and Structures: Early Tales from the University of Melbourne, edited by The Special Collection. Melbourne: History Department, University of Melbourne, 2002.

 

Downes, H. F. Build Your Own Bridge between School and University : Advice to Secondary, School Students. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Appointments Board, 1961.

 

Downes, Stephen. ‘Historian in a Plain Wrapper.’ Age. 3 Sept 1982.

Geoffrey Blainey.

 

Downing, Richard Ivan. “Papers.” 8 archives boxes, 1948-1974.

Mainly MS. and TS notes for University lectures with a little related correspondence, occasional talks to divers groups, scripts for radio and TV talks, some press cuttings etc. usually on economic topics; correspondence and other material concerning the Social Studies Department 1961-1972; material from Downing’s work with the International Labour Organization (Geneva 1950-1953) until his acceptance of the Ritchie Chair of Economic Research in late 1952

After graduating from Melbourne in 1935, Downing was at various times closely associated with the work of Professors L.F. Giblin and Sir Douglas Copland, worked for the International Labour Organization in Montreal and Geneva, and held lectureships in Western Australia and at Melbourne, where he became Ritchie Professor of Economic Research in 1952. He was also involved with many branches of the arts and was appointed Chairman of the Australian Broadcasting Commission in 1973. Richard Downing died in office in 1975.

 

Downing, Richard Ivan. “Papers.” 24 archives boxes, 1930-1976.

Correspondence, accounts, clippings, lecture notes, addresses and articles, cassettes, photographs etc. relating to Scotch College, Ormond College, University of Melbourne, King’s College, the ABC, a wide range of personal friends, property at Eltham, Mallacoota, Shoreham & Euroa ABC material 1971-75; Academy of Social Sciences reports and minutes; diaries.

 

Downing, Richard Ivan. “Records.” 65 archives boxes, 1928-1975.

Records regarding University administration, staff matters, correspondence 1954-1975; addresses and articles 1946-1974; reports and other publications on economic matters 1929-1974; reports and correspondence regarding A.B.C. 1973-1975; general personal correspondence 1938-1975; speeches and drafts; academic records; copies of  The Economic Record.

 

Downing, Richard Ivan. “Records.” 1930-1976.

Correspondence; accounts; lecture notes; addresses and articles; cassettes; photographs; newspaper clippings.

 

 

Downing, Richard Ivan. “Sir Douglas Copland: a Personal Memory.” Economic record. v.47 no.120(1971)

 

Doyle, Elizabeth. “Memorabilia.” 12 cm. (1 archives box), 1839-1962.

Scrapbooks: 1 cover only; 2 pictures of children, household articles, women (n.d. WWI?); book of character sketches and incidents of early Melbourne life, 1839 - 1942, being extracts from ‘Patriot’, by ED’s great grandfather Ambrose Neate; Tin Alley Players programmes, notices of play-readings c 1942 to 1962. MU Dramatic Club 1938 and other groups with some photographs and newscuttings relating to productions; revues 1936 to 1938; student publications 1933 to 1939. “Wattle Blossoms, some of the Grave and Gay Reminiscences of an Old Colonist” by George Wright, illustrated E. Snell, Melbourne, George Robertson, 1857; photograph of Thomas Wright, wife and children (brother of George).

 

“Dr. Jean Laby Sitting at a Microscope.” 1960s. 6” x 8” matt print copied from photograph supplied by Miss Betty Laby.

Laby (1915- ) worked with her father on the Optical Munitions Panel. She was appointed Senior Lecturer at the RAAF Academy, Point Cook in 1961, a position she occupied until 1982. During the 1970s she collaborated on Climate Assessment Program of the US Department of Transportation, funded by the Office of Naval Research and undertaken with the University of Wyoming.

 

Drawn Circle Pty Ltd. ““Miegunyah” Alterations and Additions: Plans Produced C. 1992 by Drawn Circle Pty. Ltd. For the Present Owner of the Property.” 1992.

Miegunyah was purchased in 1910 by Russell Grimwade. It was bequeathed to the University and subsequently sold to Robert Holmes a Court.

 

Drew, Mahina. “Thomas Cornelius Cole: Fragments of a Life.” In Melbourne University Mosaic: People and Places, edited by Three-Four-Eight. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1998.

Cole (1836-79) was the first student in the University of Melbourne matriculation book and one of the first to graduate. Be became a Church of England clergyman and active charity worker.

 

Dreyfus, Kay. “The Grainger Museum.” APRA journal, no. January 1976 (1976).

Originally called the “Music Museum and Grainger Museum”, and later the “Grainger Museum”, the building was constructed for Percy Grainger between 1935 and 1938. Grainger took an active part in the design of the building assisting University architects Gawler and Drummond with development of the concept. The design is strongly influenced by the Moderne or ArtDeco style. birth. The museum contains material from his own life, and much material concerning his musical contemporaries.

 

Driver, Samuel Cyril. “Evaluation of Alternative Procedures in Teaching Economic Geography, Part 1, in the University of Melbourne.” M Ed, University of Melbourne, 1973.

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. “Address to the Opening Meeting of the Australian Federation of University Women’s First Biennial Conference.” 1 leaflet, 19.

Ducker joined the staff of the Botany Department as a technical assistant in 1947 while studying for a science degree. She became a Lecturer in 1957, Senior Lecturer in 1961, and later Reader in Botany. She was awarded the degree of Doctor of Science for her studies in Marine Botany in 1979, and a D.LL. By 1988 she was a Senior Associate of the Botany School and had completed her book, The Contented Botanist; letters of W.H. Harvey about Australia and the Pacific.

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. “Correspondence.” 12 cm. 1987-1988.

Correspondence, chronologically filed in folders labeled: 1987a, 1987b, 1988a, 1988b. Letters (most inwards) are from friends and colleagues in Australia, Europe and America. Some are in German. Also, file on the Botanical History Symposium “Development of Systematic Botany in Australasia” 25-27 May 1988, Ormond College, at which Ducker was a contributor with a paper on “Early Austrian influence on Australian botany”.

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. “Files Relating to Research and Supervision of Students.” 12 cm. 1 archives box, 1962-1969.

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. “History of Botany School.” 12 cm. (1 archives box), 19.

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. “History of the Botany School. Chapter 2.” 7 pp. 1986.

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. “Notes of  Discussion.” Melbourne, 1992.

Interviewer: Carolyn Rasmussen for the History of the University Unit.

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. “Papers.” 24 cm. 2 archives boxes, 1983-1987.

Correspondence 1983-1987: Inwards, Outwards, personal and academic (in English and German) Lecture notes on (1) German influence on Australian Phycology; (2) History of Marine Biology of Victoria; (3) “Deutsch Botaniker und Australien in 19 Jahrhundert” (in German). Research material for biographical article on A.H.S. Lucas Miscellaneous papers and notes.

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. “Papers.” 12 cm. (1 archives box), 1945-1972.

ID card 1945; correspondence 1969-1972; passports; biographical articles; lecture notes 1969 on a classification of algae (Botany 11).

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. “Papers.” 19--.

Ducker’s typescripts re Isobel Cookson and Ethel McLennan; copies from Australian Archives of Ducker’s internment and refugee documents; miscellaneous newscuttings, invitations etc. relating to Ducker and her career.

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. Photographs, 1944-1979.

Letter of reappointment from Professor J. S. Turner, Botany Dept. 1 December 1944. Photographs of Sophie Ducker on graduating D.Sc. (two in office, one colour, one black and white), one with grandson.

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. The System Garden, 1985-1999.

One C90 cassette, sides A and B: photographs; Ducker’s Tramstop Lecture of 2 October 1985 ‘The System Garden’; photographs taken at her 90th birthday celebrations, with a 2-page typed list of guests’ surnames, but no matching of names to photographs; 17 colour prints, 28 April 1999.

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. “Papers.” 6 cm. 1957-1978.

Teaching and research files 1968-1978; letters from Dr Ducker’s son Claude Henry Ducker, in Malaysia 1957-1959.

 

Ducker, Sophie Charlotte. “Papers Relating to Professor Turner.” 2 cm. 1992.

Folder: Ducker’s MS. on the early career of Turner for an obituary co-authored with David Ashton; list of Turner’s research students and publications compiled by Ducker; Obituary notice for the Australian Academy of Science which includes Ducker’s account, over Ashton’s name; Text of Memorial Lecture to honour Turner, given by R.A. Fawns to the Secondary Teachers’ Association of Victoria (n.d.)

Turner, born in Middleborough, U.K. In 1938 took up an appointment to the University of Melbourne Chair of Botany, following the retirement of A.J. Ewart. Among his major projects were research into the tropic-proofing of optical instruments by a fungicide during World War II, on penicillin and on the physiological processes of plant respiration and fermentation.

 

Duffy, Charles Gavan. My Life in two Hemispheres. London: Fisher Unwin, 1898.

 

Duggleby, Alan Milne. Sporting Photographs, 1938. Three mounted photographs, each 19 x 56 cm. approx.

Group of men and women students with names written on mount; Group of male students only, with names written on mount. Most are in sports singlets and shorts. Group of students and staff, unidentified. Alan Duggleby is in each photograph.

Duggleby was a student at the Melbourne Teachers’ College in and passed his first year of the B A degree in 1941 before enlisting in the armed forces. A navigator flying with the R.A.A.F. and R.A.F. he was killed in June 1944 when flying in a Halifax bomber over Germany, aged 22.

 

Duke, Susan. “The Education of State School Teachers in Victoria 1873-1901 : With Some Reference to New South Wales and South Australia.” M Ed, University of Melbourne, 1976.

 

Dulhunty, Helen. “Militant Apathy: Whatever Happened to Student Activism.” In Melbourne University Characters and Controversies, edited by Chiaroscuro: Department of History, University of Melbourne, 2001.

 

Dunkin, Henry Haughton. “Mining and Metallurgical Education in Victoria.” Proceedings of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy. ns no.158-159(1950).

 

Dunkin, Henry Haughton. “Papers.” 180 cm. (15 Archives boxes), 1940-1974.

Teaching materials: Lecture notes for Mining, Metallurgy and related subjects; transcript of Student Roll 1875-1940, Department of Mining; equipment catalogues; papers on conferences; Australian Chemical Industry lectures (Some Principles of Crushing and Grinding); photographs.

Dunkin was appointed as Senior Lecturer in Mining in the Department of Metallurgy on 1 March 1939, and served as Sub-Dean and Acting Professor from 1940-1944. He was appointed Associate Professor in January 1949, serving until his retirement in 1974.

 

Dunlop, Gordon. ‘Self Management in Original Cataloguing Services, 1993.’ Ex Libris. no.27(Dec. 1993).

 

Dunn, Terrence R. ‘An Empirical Demonstration of Bias in HSC Examination Results.’ Australian journal of education. v.26(Aug 1982).

 

Dunn, Terrence R. Bias in HSC Scores and Equality of Access to Universities : A Study of Entry to the University of Melbourne, Research Working Paper; No. 81.1 Centre for the Study of Higher Education University of Melbourne, 1981.

 

Duras, Fritz. “Papers.” 48 cm. (4 archives boxes), 1937-1973.

Duras was born and educated in Germany where he graduated in medicine. He came to Australia by invitation in 1937 to create the first University course in physical education in Australia. Duras remained at the University of Melbourne as the Associate Professor and Director of the department until his death in 1962. He was also the pioneer and first president of the Australian Physical Education Association, a foundation member of the Australian Sports Medicine Association and the first director of the International Physical Education Conference in Australia.

 

During, Simon. ‘Professing the Popular.’ Meanjin. v.49 no.3(Spring 1990).

English and Cultural Studies.

 

Dutch Club. “Memorabilia.” 3 items, 1973.

Drie Maal Huygens, presented by Melbourne University Dutch Students’ Club in honour of Professor J. Smit, Guild Theatre: ticket; programme (including text and short explanation in English) and John Martin’s copy of the script.

 

Dutch Club. “Op De Hoogte”, Magazine of De Nederlandse Club (Dutch Club). 6 v. vols. Melbourne: De Nederlandse Club, 1984-1989.

 

Dyason, Diana. “After Thirty Years: History and Philosophy of Science in Australia, 1946-76.” Melbourne studies in education (1977).

 

Dyason, Diana. “Diana Dyason.” In Memories of Melbourne University : Undergraduate Life in the Years since 1917, edited by Hume Dow. Richmond, Vic.: Hutchinson of Australia, 1983.

After working as Demonstrator in the Physiology Department 1943-49, Dyason was appointed to the Department of General Science, later the Department of History and Philosophy of Science. She was appointed Reader in 1965 and served as head of the department for many years.

 

Dyason, Diana. “Material Regarding University Women’s College.” 12 cm. (1 archives box), 1947-1965.

 

Dyason, Diana. “Papers.” 15 archives boxes, 1950-1989.

Order of proceedings for the Gathering of the Friends and Colleagues of the late ‘Ding’ Dyason, Tuesday, 31 October 1989 - 3.00 pm Upper East Dining Room, University House. Leaflet. Item shown at the above occasion: Photographs of child patients pasted on paper with legend in gold: “The Council and Staff of the Royal Children’s Hospital School remember with affection and gratitude the contribution of Diana Dyason as a member of the Council 1983 to 1988. Vale Ding.” 42 x 29.5 cm.

Research papers.

 

Dyason, Diana. “Papers.” 102 archives boxes, 1942-1984.

Personal and University papers including: family correspondence; general correspondence; university correspondence; family papers; undergraduate and postgraduate material; notebooks; H.P.S. examination papers 194-1966; lecture notes; synopsis; course details; syllabus details; University Assembly papers; administration material; subject files A-Z; conference material; research; papers regarding travel, interior design, gardening; photographs; financial papers; newspaper cuttings; publications.

 

Dyason, Diana. “Preludes.” In The Half-Open Door : Sixteen Modern Australian Women Look at Professional Life and Achievement, edited by Patricia Grimshaw and Lynne Strahan. Sydney, N.S.W.: Hale & Iremonger, 1982.

 

Dyason, Diana. “James Jamieson and the Ladies,” In Harold Attwood and R. W. Home, Eds. Patients, Practitioners and Techniques : Second National Conference on Medicine and Health in Australia, 1984, Occasional Papers on Medical History Australia;. Parkville, Vic.: Medical History Unit and Dept. of History and Philosophy of Science University of Melbourne : Medical History Society AMA (Victorian Branch), 1985.

 

Dyason, Diana. “The Medical Profession in Colonial Victoria.” In Roy MacLeod and Milton Lewis, Eds. Disease, Medicine and Empire: Perspectives on Western Medicine and the Experience of European Expansion. London: Routledge, 1988.

 

Eady, Lydia. Interview with Lydia Eady, 1982.

Recorded by the Australia 1938 Oral History Project as research for the book Australians 1938 from the series Australians, a historical library.

Eady and occasionally her mother speak with Anne Neil of family  background; school memories; childhood memories; recreation;  employment; university experiences; social life; family home and living conditions; family life; politics; Australian society; health and  health care; religion; migrants; events of the 1930s; overseas situation of later 30s; entertainment.

Inquiries to the National Library of Australia.

.

Edgar, Don. “The Educational Ideas and Influence on Victorian Education of Dr. John Smyth : Principal of the Melbourne Teachers’ College, 1902-1927 and the First Professor of Education in the University of Melbourne, 1918-1927.” M.Ed. University of Melbourne, 1967.

 

Edmonds (Kenneth) & Associates Pty Ltd. “Drawings of “Miegunyah”.” 1888-1993.

3 Drawings of “Miegunyah”: 1. Harold Desbrowe-Annear drawing containing 3 sections, 3 elevations, ground and roof plans re alterations (cartridge paper) 1920; 2. and 3. Stephenson & Meldrum, alterations 1933 (on linen).

 

Edmonds, Alton G. and Elizabeth Edmonds. “Photographs, 1935-1937”.

Agriculture Students 1935; University Swimming Team Inter-Varsity Champions 1936-1937; Student Representative Council 1937. McCoy Society Report No.1. Lady Julia Percy Island, 1935 Expedition, in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria Vol.49, 1937; McCoy Society Report No.2, Sir Joseph Banks Islands Part I. List of Vascular Plants. By S.G.M. Fawcett and C. Elizabeth Vance.

Vance, B.Sc. (Adel.) entered the University of Melbourne in 1937 as an M.Sc. candidate. She took part in the expedition by the McCoy Society for Field Investigation and Research to the Sir Joseph Banks Islands. She married Alton G. Edmonds (B. AgSci. 1937).

 

Edwards, Lucy. “A Policy of Gradualness: Leigh Scott and the University of Melbourne Library 1926-1953.” Monash, 1992.

 

Edwards, Sarah, and Lisa Sullivan. The Art Collection of Janet Clarke Hall: Exhibition Catalogue. Melbourne: University Gallery, 1997.

 

Ehrlich, Rita. “Rita Ehrlich.” In More Memories of Melbourne University : Undergraduate Life in the Years since 1919, edited by Hume Dow. Melbourne: Hutchinson, 1985.

Ehrlich, who took her MA from Melbourne University in 1972, has worked the Australian Jewish News, the Australian, Age and Sun and edited the Age Good Food Guide.

 

Ellis, Frank. “Papers.” 72 cm. (6 archives boxes), 1910-1960.

Correspondence 1937-1956; speeches and pamphlets 1925-1060; testimonials 1910-1927; photographs; papers, minutes and reports of organizations with which Ellis was involved, including the Faculty of Engineering University of Melbourne 1948; Engineering Graduate Sub-Committee 1950, Melbourne Technical College Council 1944, Technical College Board 1944-1948, Committee for proposed University of Technology 1946-1956, conference for co-operation between Melbourne Technical College and University of Melbourne 1941; Collingwood Technical College report 1934-41; newspaper cuttings 1947-53; diploma syllabuses 1924-55.

Ellis was born in 1886 and educated at the Prince Alfred College in Adelaide. After graduating he worked as a lecturer at the Technical College in Tasmania from 1910 until his appointment in 1918 as Superintendent. Ellis resigned in 1927 when he was appointed Principal of the Melbourne Technical College and became a key figure in the movement to establish Melbourne’s first institute of technology. He was Secretary of the Technical University Development Committee and Honorary Treasurer of the Institute of Industrial Management, Australia. During World War Two, Ellis trained technical personnel.

 

“Elsie Ruth Nicol.” 1900. 1 photograph

Elsie Nicol graduated B A on 17 March 1900 and M A on 5 April 1902.

 

Eltham, Ernest Percy. “Memorabilia.” 4 items, 1915-1920.

Photograph, “Melbourne ‘Varsity Cricket Team, Adelaide 13/12/21”, with individuals named (including E.P. Eltham); Melbourne University Cricket Club Dinner menu, with numerous signatures on back,16 Dec. 1920; Students’ Representative Council dance programme, 16 July 1920; Invitation to Eltham from the Students’ Representative Council to “an Informal Social as a Welcome to Freshman” in the Melba Hall, 30

April 1915.

 

Epps, William. Anderson Stuart, M.D.: Physiologist, Teacher, Builder, Organizer, Citizen. Sydney: Angus and Robertson, 1922.

 

Epstein, June.Kindergarten Training College Graduation Ceremony Programmes.” 12 cm. 1953-1976.

Kindergarten Training College Graduation Ceremony Programmes, 1953, 1954, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964; Melbourne Kindergarten Teachers’ College Graduation Ceremony Programmes, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972; State College of Victoria Institute of Early Childhood Development Graduation Ceremony Programmes. 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976. “Graduation Hymn” (words and music) with Epstein’s notes on this and the College Song and musical activities; Copies of IASTV Proceedings and other journals.

 

Ericksen, Ray Francis Stanley. “Papers.” 6 cm. + one fall-front box of 6”x 4” index cards.

Extract of entry of birth certificate; B A certificate; photo graphs, including portrait as a toddler, wedding photos; University-related photos e.g. trip to Glenisla and the Grampians with Mulvaney et al. photos of other people e.g. Ray Ericksen’s sisters, colleagues Jim Main, John O’Brien etc. Photos of house and garden he built at 27 Mortimer St. Heidelberg + card index of native spp. planted. More pieces of his writing, mainly relating to MSS previously received; copies of eulogies delivered at his funeral, and of published obituaries from Age, Herald Sun, Australian, West Australian, & Australian Book Collector. Box of his black & white snaps taken while on the ‘West of Centre’ trip 1967, and his 1:1,000,000 annotated Australian Geographical Series map SG-52, Petermann Ranges sheet (1963) from that trip.

Ericksen was born 2 September 1919, was educated at Austral Coaching College and Melbourne University (B A in History 1939- 1941, conferred 1946), then serving in the Australian Army 1941-46. He lectured in the History Department 1947-59, switching in 1960 to an administrative post as Sub-Dean, then Assistant Dean, in the Arts Faculty 1960-66,1969. A change of direction found him heading to inland Australia; looking for himself (written up in West of Centre, 1972), he found the story of explorer Ernest Giles and embarked on a biography (Ernest Giles: Explorer and Traveller, 1835-1897, published in 1978). Ericksen also published Cape Solitary (1975, winner of the 1976 National Book Council Award for Australian Literature), and a number of shorter items ed. James Walter and Raija Nugent, The Institute for Modern Biography, Griffith University, 1984). He was a contributor to Biographers at Work.

 

Esposito, Nicole. “A Woman of High Distinction: Ethel McLennan.” In Melbourne University Characters and Controversies, edited by Chiaroscuro: Department of History, University of Melbourne, 2001.

McLennan graduated B.Sc. in 1915 with first class honours and distinction in Botany and Zoology. She was appointed Demonstrator-Lecturer in Botany that year. She graduated D.Sc. in 1921, received the Syme Prize in 1927, and became Associate Professor in Botany in 1931. She retired in 1957 and died in 1983. Dr. McLennan’s activities included directing research in mycology pathology, assisted in setting up the National Collection of Fungi; and assisted in investigations into diseases of various crops.

 

“Essays in Honour of Sir Douglas Copland.” Economic record. v.36 no.73(1960).

 

Esson, Hugh. “The Ewing Art Gallery.” Melbourne University magazine. v. 31(1938).

 

“Eucalyptus Maculata (Spotted Gum), Planted 1858 by Ferdinand Von Mueller in the Garden in Engineering School Residence.” 19.. Framed photograph.

The tree was storm damaged and felled in 2002.

 

Eva, Caroline. “Come Together: The 1955 University of Melbourne Centenary Appeal.” In Melbourne University Characters and Controversies, edited by Chiaroscuro: Department of History, University of Melbourne, 2001.

The Centenary Appeal Women’s Committee organised social events to support the University’s appeal for £1 million to celebrate its centenary in 1955.

 

Evans, Morgan, Simon Norton, and Polly Bastow. “Pumping Irony [Videorecording] : Architecture Revue, 1992.” edited by Dylan Ingleton, 1992. 1 videocassette (VHS) (108 min.) : sd. col.; 1/2 in

 

“F. Maurice-Carton with French Class 1903 Including Dr. Muirhead’s Mother (Martha Bergin Tipping) Third from Right.” 1903. 1 photograph, 20” x 16” and negative

Original inscribed on the back “Mes meilleurs souhaits de bonne année F.I.M.C.”

 

Factor, June. “June Factor.” In More Memories of Melbourne University : Undergraduate Life in the Years since 1919, edited by Hume Dow. Melbourne: Hutchinson, 1985.

Factor is an authority on children’s culture and folklore and has been heavily involved in supporting the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Her books for children include Far Out Brussel Sprout and she co-edited Cinderella Dressed in Yella.

 

Fairley, Neil Hamilton. “Papers [in the Basser Library Australian Academcy of Science.”]

Fairley (1891-1966) was Director of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute 1920-22.

Collection includes biographical material and photographs.

 

Falk, Barbara. “Margaret Blackwood.” In 200 Australian Women: A Redress Anthology, edited by Heather Radi. Sydney: Redress Press, 1988.

 

Falk, Barbara. “The Unpayable Debt.” In The Half-Open Door : Sixteen Modern Australian Women Look at Professional Life and Achievement, edited by Patricia Grimshaw and Lynne Strahan. Sydney, N.S.W.: Hale & Iremonger, 1982.

Falk was Principal of Mercer House before lecturing in Education at Melbourne University and becoming foundation Director of the Centre for the Study if Higher Education. Books published after her retirement include Caught in a Snare and No Other Home and a biography of Dorothy Ross.

 

Falk, Barbara. Recorded Interview. Melbourne, 1991.

With Carolyn Rasmussen for the History of the University Unit

Inquiries to the History of the University Office.

 

Fallows, Terri. “John Neill Greenwood: Man of Steel.” In Melbourne University Portraits: They Called It ‘the Shop’, edited by Paper-Clip Collective. Melbourne: University of Melbourne Department of History, 1996.

Greenwood (1894-1981), was appointed to the new Chair of Metallurgy in 1924, which he held until 1945. In 1946 he was appointed Research Professor of Metallurgy, and from 1957- 1959 was Dean of Applied Science. In 1960 he was appointed to a Personal Chair, retiring in 1964. In 1962 Greenwood participated in the Royal Commission to enquire into the failure of King’s Bridge, Melbourne.

 

Falvey, J. Lindsay Land and Food : Agricultural and Related Education in the Victorian Colleges and the University of Melbourne. Parkville, Vic.: Institute of Land and Food Resources